The driver was treated for hypothermia and frostbite after being trapped under four feet of snow, police say

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man trapped in snow
Credit: New York State Police/Facebook

A New York man spent more than 10 hours trapped inside his car without heat after the vehicle was covered in snow.

Giant winter storms rolled through the Northeast overnight into Thursday morning, bringing the first major snowfall of the season. New York State Police said they received 911 calls in Tioga County that morning after the extreme weather.

There was, according to a press release, a "driver who ran off the road and needed assistance, but had not been located."

Zone Sgt. Jason Cawley of Troop C patrolled around the roadway scanning for the person's car but couldn't find anything. Eventually, Cawley "saw what appeared to be a row of mailboxes and waded through the snow to check the addresses."

"While digging, he hit the windshield of a car and inside was the subject who had been making 911 calls," police said.

The man was identified as 58-year-old Kevin Kresen of Candor, New York. Kresen told police that he was stranded in his car for over 10 hours total — with no heat since the vehicle's serpentine belt was broken. He claimed that he'd been "plowed in by a truck and his car covered with close to four feet of snow."

man trapped in snow
Credit: New York State Police/Facebook
man trapped in snow
Credit: New York State Police/Facebook

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Authorities removed Kresen from the vehicle and he was taken to a nearby hospital, where he was treated after suffering hypothermia and frostbite.

"The actions of Sergeant Cawley no doubt saved the driver’s life. Job well done," the department wrote on Facebook, sharing photos of Cawley posing with Kresen while wearing masks in his hospital room.

Dubbed Winter Storm Gail by the Weather Channel, the storm kicked off in the Virginia, Maryland and Washington, D.C., areas before heading north. The NWS previously reported on Tuesday that Gail was expected to span about 1,000 miles, from the top of North Carolina up through New York and Pennsylvania.