The fire has so far burned 4,100 acres and is zero percent contained

By Rachel DeSantis
November 26, 2019 01:57 PM
MIKE ELIASON/HANDOUT/EPA-EFE/Shutterstock

A fire broke out near Santa Barbara on Monday afternoon, prompting thousands of mandatory evacuations in the days leading up to Thanksgiving.

The Cave Fire started burning around 4:15 p.m. in the Santa Ynez Mountains east of the intersection of State Highway 154 and East Camino Cielo Road, according to a county press release.

The flames have so far burned 4,100 acres and is zero percent contained, the county’s fire public information officer Mike Eliason said on Twitter.

As of Tuesday morning, 600 firefighters had been sent to quell the fire, and there were no reported injuries or destroyed homes, he said.

Still, the blaze is approaching the cities of Santa Barbara and Goleta, which more than 6,300 residents call home, according to the release.

Cave Fire
MIKE ELIASON/HANDOUT/EPA-EFE/Shutterstock

Evacuation orders have been put in place from Ontare to Patterson Ave., north of Cathedral Oaks Road, according to Cal Fire.

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“The Cave Fire is causing conditions of extreme peril to the safety of persons and property within Santa Barbara County,” the county release read.

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The director of County Emergency Services declared a local emergency on Monday morning, and requested that California Gov. Gavin Newsom proclaim a state of emergency.

Cave Fire
MIKE ELIASON/HANDOUT/EPA-EFE/Shutterstock

The Los Angeles Times reported that 2,400 homes were under mandatory evacuation orders, and that the area’s steep and rocky terrain made fighting the fire difficult.

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Expected rain on Tuesday night is expected to help.

“First we saw smoke, and it wasn’t too alarming,” Stan Jeffries, who evacuated along with his wife at around 2:30 a.m., told the outlet. “As it got darker, you could see the flames and they began to blossom.”

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