Edinburg Fire Department Chief Shawn Snider said that the well was 44 feet deep, but that the boy only fell about 9½ feet down

By Rachel DeSantis
December 10, 2020 11:05 AM
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Boy falls into well
Well rescue
| Credit: City of Mission, TX

A 4-year-old boy who fell down a water well in Texas was rescued in dramatic fashion this week after he spent six hours stranded.

The city of Mission, Texas shared video of the incredible rescue in Garceño, in which the boy can be seen being pulled to safety while attached to a series of harnesses and ropes as bystanders clap.

“So proud of our Mission firefighters & all 1st responders that rescued the child after 6 long hrs.,” the city wrote on Twitter. “Pit was only 8-10 inches in diameter. It’s a Christmas miracle!”

Deputies responded just before 5 p.m. on Tuesday to a report of a child falling into a water well on a ranch property, the Starr County Sheriff’s Office said in a statement.

He was able to communicate with first responders, and was eventually pulled to safety “alert and talking,” and was airlifted to a local hospital.

The sheriff’s office said Wednesday that the child was in stable condition, and was being monitored as he underwent tests.

“Last night proved to be a testament of our community and neighboring communities’ unity and sincere concern for each other,” Sheriff Rene “Orta” Fuentes said in a statement. “Through prayers and actions from everyone, a little boy lives today.”

Boy falls into well
Well rescue
| Credit: City of Mission, TX

Edinburg Fire Department Chief Shawn Snider said that the well was 44 feet deep, but that the boy only fell about 9½ feet down, ABC affiliate KRGV reported.

RELATED VIDEO: Boy, 2, Trapped for Over 3 Days After Falling 360 Feet Down Well: We Are 'Broken,' Dad Says

He told the outlet that because the well’s opening was so small, rescuers had to dig next to it with shovels and air-operated hammers, which posed a risk of collapsing, until they met up with him.

“Any vibration, any wrong strike of a shovel, could cause more soil to fall into the hole where the victim was,” assistant Mission Fire Chief Robert Alvarez told NBC/CBS affiliate KVEO.

“What was key in the successful outcome of this too, was that everybody pitched in – everybody,” he added. “You saw a sheriff’s officer with a shovel helping us move soil…whatever needed to be done.”