Stars like Jimmy Fallon, John Krasinski, Michelle Obama, and Idris Elba were scored based on their at-home setups

By Eric Todisco
April 21, 2020 03:40 PM
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Celebrity homes have become subject to both criticism and praise from a hilarious new Twitter account that is going viral.

Created by Claude Taylor, the “Room Rater” (@ratemyskyperoom) has been grading celebrity homes based on screenshots from their remote call-ins to talk shows and news programs as they isolate amid the coronavirus pandemic.

It’s safe to say that the Room Rater did not hold back — beginning with Jimmy Fallon‘s “hobbit house.”

“You live in a hobbit house, but the kids are adorbs,” Room Rater said about the Tonight Show host’s home, grading it a 7/10 thanks to Fallon’s daughters Frances Cole, 5, and Winnie Rose, 6.

ABC News’ Deborah Roberts received an astounding 9/10 from the Room Rater. “Great set up. (That’s a hanging mask at left) Depth. Composition. Color. Great detail,” the account said.

The Tonight Show Starring Jimmy Fallon

However, NBA legend Charles Barkley’s residence failed to impress.

“Camera placement is issue so it may be better than 5/10. Let’s see more. Cheers,” the account tweeted.

Vice President Mike Pence got perhaps the lowest score, a 2/10, as his room was deemed “unimaginative.”

John Kransinski, whose been hosting his uplifting weekly show Some Good News from his home, came out with a solid 8/10 score from the Room Rater, which tweeted, “Nice object selection. Kids help is a plus.”

Michelle Obama‘s residence faired very well, It was described by Room Rater as “sophisticated,” “elegant,” and “classic,” earning a 9/10 score.

Idris Elba and his wife Sabrina, both of whom tested positive for COVID-19, earned an 8/10 for their setup, which included a nod to Star Trek.

Additional high scoring celebs included Robin Roberts, Bill Clinton, Jane Lynch, Ellen DeGeneres, and Oprah Winfrey.

Others like Pete Buttigieg, Samantha Bee, Jimmy Kimmel, and James Corden dropped the ball on their home setups and were left with low scores.

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