The rising Seine is spilling into the streets and wreaking havoc on the city after nearly a week of heavy rainfall

By Mackenzie Schmidt
January 24, 2018 06:06 PM
Advertisement
Credit: Ludovic Marin/Getty

The rising Seine is spilling into the streets and wreaking havoc on the city after nearly a week of heavy rainfall in Paris.

Water levels had risen to almost 17 feet as of Wednesday — more than double the average, according to ABC news.

By Tuesday, the river breached its stone walls and began flooding adjacent walkways and roads, forcing City Hall to declare an Orange-level alert, its second-highest warning. “We are remaining extremely vigilant,” said Paris mayor Anne Hidalgo.

On Wednesday, the railway company SNCF closed seven train stations located along the river, interrupting commuter lines and major tourist stops near the Eiffel Tower and Notre Dame. Visitors to the capital will also find boat cruises are canceled and roads around the Eiffel Tower, which sits on the river’s bank, are closed.

Lower levels of the Louvre have also closed and numerous artworks have been moved to higher ground as part of the museum’s emergency action plan.

Credit: Aurelien Morissard/Getty

The water level will likely continue to rise until Saturday and is expected to peak at around 19.5 feet, according to deputy mayor Colombe Brossel, the Washington Post reported.

Credit: Ludovic Marin/Getty

The deluge has been dubbed “the flood of the century” by many on social media. Though the city is not infrequently hit with similar conditions — 2016 saw a similar disaster — a legendary flood in 1910, during which the river reached 28 feet, holds the record.