March 30, 2017 08:00 AM

 

Home-improvement superstars Drew & Jonathan Scott are opening up about their childhood, finding their true loves, and why they’re still living together! Subscribe now for the exclusive tell all – only in PEOPLE!

With five popular TV shows under their belt — not to mention books, furniture lines and a production company — there’s no doubt HGTV stars Drew and Jonathan Scott have found success as the Property BrothersBut the twins had their first big hit long before they found fame on TV.

RELATED: Love, Marriage – and Babies! How the Property Brothers Finally Settled Down – and Why They Still Live Together

Born in British Columbia in 1978, the Scott brothers had an entrepreneurial spirit from an early age. The youngest of three children raised by parents Jim, 83, and Joanne, 72, who owned a horse ranch (older brother J.D., 40, is a producer and host in Las Vegas), “those two were into everything,” their father recalls.

At age 7, they started their first company, making fabric-covered wire hangers for spending money. They began selling to friends; later a wholesaler in Japan bought the product in bulk, making the boys mini moguls. “We would look at our bank accounts, and there would be $15,000 in there,” says Drew. Luckily, he adds, “We were savers, big time.”

WATCH THIS: The ‘Property Brothers’ Open Up About Finally Finding Love

  • Watch the full episode of People Cover Story: The Property Brothers, streaming now on People/Entertainment Weekly Network (PEN). Go to PEOPLE.com/PEN, or download the app for Apple TV, Roku, Amazon Fire TV, Xumo, Chromecast, Xfinity, iOS and Android devices.

The even managed to bail their parents out of a financial snag. While visiting family in Scotland, Jim and Joanne found their credits card frozen. “So we had to float our parents for a week until their new credit cards arrived,” says Jonathan.

RELATED: How Property Brothers‘ Drew and Jonathan Scott Knew Their Girlfriends Were the Ones

At age 8, they enrolled in clown school and began performing at parties, charging up to $100 an hour. “We were always looking for something that we could do,” says Jonathan. “It couldn’t be a paper route. It had to be something that we felt was scalable. That’s stuck with us even now in adulthood.”

For more on Drew and Jonathan’s rise to stardom, pick up this week’s issue of PEOPLE, on newsstands Friday

— With MACKENZIE SCHMIDT

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