Bass put in an offer to purchase the famed home in August, but was ultimately outbid by HGTV

By Joelle Goldstein
September 16, 2019 11:43 PM

Lance Bass is living out his Brady Bunch dreams!

A year after the former *NSYNC star was outbid by HGTV to purchase the house, whose iconic facade served as the exterior of the Brady family home on the hit sitcom, Bass was welcomed inside the newly renovated Studio City, California residence.

In a video posted to Instagram on Monday, Bass and his husband Michael Turchin were given an exclusive tour of the home that HGTV recently redesigned to look exactly as it did on the beloved ’70s sitcom — and they certainly did not disappoint.

Though Bass, 40, was initially disappointed to lose out on buying the home, the star said he was very excited to see what HGTV did and couldn’t think of anyone better to buy the property.

“Now we all remember I almost got this house but I’m super excited HGTV got it because I know it’s in good hands,” he told the camera before entering the residence. “Honey, I’m home!”

RELATED: Lance Bass Will Be Part of HGTV’s Brady Bunch House Show After Losing Out on Buying It

Immediately upon entering, Bass was blown away by the identical interior design. 

“Wow, this is incredible! This is perfect!” he said in the clip, as he posed and took selfies with the “iconic staircase” and several rooms in the home, including Mike Brady’s den and Jan Brady’s bedroom.

“It looks so real that it looks fake!” he added. “This is one of the happiest days of my life!”

Bass also said that he believes the Brady home décor will inspire others to design their homes in similar ways before noting how impressed he was with the home improvement and real estate television network.

“I think this Brady renovation is going to lead to a lot of people embracing the ’70s look again,” he shared. “I was afraid of someone getting this house and knocking it down. HGTV did the right thing. Kudos, HGTV.”

Lance Bass
HGTV/Instagram

RELATED: Lance Bass Is ‘Heartbroken’ After Losing Bidding War for Brady Bunch House: ‘I Feel Used’

In early Aug. 2018, Bass announced that he had put in an offer to purchase the Brady Bunch home and it was accepted.

Unfortunately for him, one day after publicly sharing the news, the former boybander learned he was outbid by another buyer, which was later revealed to be HGTV.

While he didn’t get to personally move in, Bass revealed to PEOPLE in Sept. 2018 that he would be helping HGTV produce a show about the famous home — all thanks to his loyal fanbase.

“The fans came to my rescue. They saw how hosed I got,” he said while attending the iHeartRadio festival in Las Vegas, referring to the real estate loss. “They forced HGTV’s hand to get me involved.”

Bass also told PEOPLE what he wanted to do with the home, had he landed it.

“I’m a huge Brady fan, so I wanted to turn the house into what we all knew from the television show because all they did was use it for exterior,” he explained. “The inside looks nothing like it, so I was gonna add a lot of square footage, add a second floor and try to turn it into that iconic set.”

The Brady Bunch home
Douglas Elliman; Everett

RELATED: Maureen McCormick (A.K.A. Marcia Brady) Wanted to Buy Brady Bunch House, Later Purchased by HGTV

It appears that HGTV may have taken a few ideas from the star, as they remodeled the interior exactly like the iconic set from the show that Bass was referring to.

The instantly recognizable house that served as the facade of the Brady home on the hit series that ran from 1969 to 1974 was listed with Douglas Elliman for $1.88 million.

According to the listing, the home, located at 11222 Dilling Street in Studio City, California, is reportedly the second most photographed house in the U.S. after the White House.

The cast of The Brady Bunch
Everett

The house was reportedly selected for the show by creator Sherwood Schwartz for its approachable yet of-the-moment aesthetic. “We didn’t want it to be too affluent, we didn’t want it to be too blue-collar,” he told the Los Angeles Times in 1994. “We wanted it to look like it would fit a place an architect would live.”

He also revealed that the set designers added a faux window to the top of the house to give the illusion of a full second floor that existed in the built interiors.

The home first appeared in the second-ever episode of the show and was seen in every episode after.

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