The Real Housewives of New Jersey star is still living in Italy after his third deportation appeal was denied in April

By Claudia Harmata
July 23, 2020 04:41 PM
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Joe Giudice may be a home renovation TV star in the making!

The Real Housewives of New Jersey star — who is living in Italy following his release from ICE custody late last year — has been hard at work renovating an old Italian villa owned by his estranged wife Teresa Giudice's father for their four daughters.

Joe, 48, has been documenting the home rehab with a new YouTube series, This Old Villa with Joe Giudice, which premiered in May.

"Me and the old man [Teresa's father] were very close and it goes to the kids, so I am finishing it," Joe recently told Extra. "I started filming it and they came up with 'This Old Villa.'"

Joe told the outlet he also planned to live in the home "when the kids come, when I'm there." He shares daughters Gia, 18, Gabriella, 15, Milania, 14, and Audriana, 10, with Teresa.

This Old Villa/Youtube
Joe Giudice
This Old Villa/Youtube

In a trailer for the series, fans are shown snippets of the remodeling and renovation process, all of which appear to be filmed by Joe himself.

The clips are edited together with text setting up how the unique project came to be: "Life for Joe Giudice had gotten crazy. There was only one thing to do. Get out of New Jersey," it reads, seemingly referencing Joe's deportation.

"Watch out Italy," it continues. "Joe Giudice arrived. Be afraid Italy, very afraid."

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Joe has since uploaded 18 videos that vary in length from around 10 to over 20 minutes in length.

In the first episode, he gives fans a brief history lesson about the area the villa is located in, before diving into the cleaning process of the seemingly long-uninhabited property, which has bare, crumbling concrete walls.

In the most recent episode, having made some progress stabilizing the structure and creating interior walls, Joe meets with an interior designer and the pair go to a furniture store to begin picking out pieces for the updated home.

Last month, Joe celebrated his first Father's Day since moving to Italy. His family sent him heartfelt messages from afar on social media.

"Happy Fathers Day @joe.giudice The girls miss you today & every day!" Teresa, 48, wrote alongside a throwback photo of Joe with their daughters.

In her own post, Gia paid tribute to both her father, as well as her late grandfather, Giacinto Gorga, who died in April.

"Happy Father’s Day to the most amazing people in my life and souls who keep me going every single day! Dad thank you for showing me how to show strength, Nonno thank you for always pushing me to be my best self, and Zio Joe thank you for being there when I always need you," she wrote, alongside a series of family photos.

Joe has been trying to get his deportation case appealed, but it was denied for the third time in April.

"We have always maintained that Joe Giudice belongs in the United States with his family, not in Italy," Joe's attorney James J. Leonard told PEOPLE. "The immigration laws in our country are both draconian and antiquated and need to be revisited by forward-thinking members of Congress."

Teresa and Joe Giudice with their daughters
Joe Giudice/Instagram

As for whether or not Joe will appeal the decision again, Leonard said at the time, "That will be discussed with Joe and his immigration counsel in the coming days."

Despite the news, Leonard reveals Joe is "very positive about life."

"He's in Italy doing everything he can to keep busy, and stay healthy. I know he's working on some projects that I'm sure you will hear about soon," he added at the time. "For now, it's a day at a time like everyone else."

Teresa and Joe “separated” after 20 years of marriage in December 2019 amid the deportation process, a source close to the couple confirmed to PEOPLE. According to the source, they “agreed that each had to move on” and “are doing so amicably and very slowly.”