From teepees and tents to caves and castles, IKEA's suggested structures are creative ways to help change-up playtime

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Ikea
Ikea
| Credit: Francis Dean/Getty Images

IKEA has a plan for parents running out of ideas for ways to entertain their kids during the novel coronavirus (COVID-19) pandemic.

Earlier this month, the Swedish furniture giant's Russian branch released six illustrated instruction manuals on Instagram for building a series of at-home forts using some of its most popular offerings like tables, chairs, couches, blankets, comforters, pillows, hangers, string lights and more.

While clarifying that the suggested structures are not "official IKEA user guides for IKEA products," the examples are certainly creative ways to help change-up playtime while families across the global practice social distancing by staying at home.

From teepees and tents to caves and castles, the IKEA plans make creating a fun fortress at home a lot easier.

"If you can't find the products referred to in the instructions, use similar ones," IKEA said, stressing that parents always need to "make sure the structure is safe [and] do not leave children unattended."

IKEA Pillow Forts
Credit: Ikea_Rus/Instagram
IKEA Pillow Forts
Credit: Ikea_Rus/Instagram
IKEA Pillow Forts
Credit: Ikea_Rus/Instagram
IKEA Pillow Forts
Credit: Ikea_Rus/Instagram
IKEA Pillow Forts
Credit: Ikea_Rus/Instagram
IKEA Pillow Forts
Credit: Ikea_Rus/Instagram

IKEA's at-home fort hacks come after the company unveiled the recipe for their beloved meatballs for fans to make at home.

Like the fort-making instructions, the meatball recipe came with a step-by-step illustrated diagram.

The Swedish furniture giant’s UK branch posted the tutorial on their Twitter page last month with the drawing showing how to make the meatballs and the special cream sauce. Both recipes include common pantry and fridge items, making this a great meal to cook as people practice social distancing.

Meanwhile, the 51 IKEA stores throughout the United States remained closed due to the outbreak.

"We know this hasn’t been easy, and there are many challenges we will face in the coming weeks and months," Javier Quiñones, President of IKEA Retail U.S., said on the company's website. "We will all face dilemmas and difficult decisions. No matter what happens, we will always come back to our main commitment — to act in the best interests of our co-workers and the many people."

"We are continuing to evaluate the needs of our business today, while anticipating the future of IKEA so we can make it through this crisis together — and reemerge stronger than before," he added.

And though it might be a while before Americans can fully meander through the floors of IKEA again, as of May 11, the company has been rolling out "Click & Collect" for curbside customer order pick-ups at select stores.

"We are using guidance from the CDC and state authorities to ensure that opening in this capacity is safe for co-workers and customers within the context of the local COVID-19 situation," Quiñones said.

Customers should visit IKEA's local store page to see if their store is offering the "Click & Collect" service.