Fans helped the creative couple curate a list of home, fashion and lifestyle brands and makers from across the country

By Hannah Chubb
July 02, 2020 05:24 PM
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Chip and Joanna Gaines are using their Magnolia empire to bring some attention to their favorite Black-owned lifestyle brands from across the country. 

The Fixer Upper alums took to their Magnolia social media platforms on Thursday to share that they have curated a list of incredible businesses that people can find and shop on the Magnolia website — an idea that was both inspired and driven by their fans. 

In early June, as protests in support of racial equality and against police brutality grew across the country in response to the death of George Floyd, Twitter user @BrookersM tweeted at Chip with a suggestion: “Hey @chipgaines, local Wacoan here. What do you think about @magnolia doing an online vendor fair for local black businesses in Waco? Like you did for Silobration this year. This would be a way to lead by example in our community! #blm @joannagaines.”

Shortly after, Chip replied: “Love this idea! Give me a sec and I’ll come up with some ideas..”

Magnolia’s social media platforms soon put out a call for fans to share the Black-owned businesses close to their hearts, in Waco and far beyond, asking them to “nominate Black business owners, artisans, and creators who have inspired or motivated you.” 

Now, after being happily “overwhelmed with the outpouring of recommendations,” these businesses — which range from fashion and accessory lines to home decor brands and everything in between — can all be found in one place on the Magnolia website

RELATED VIDEO: Joanna Gaines on Getting Kids into Projects and How They're Following Her and Chip's Footsteps

In June, Tayo Giwa and Cynthia Gordy Giwa, founders of the website Black-Owned Brooklyn, which spotlights Black-owned companies in New York City, spoke to PEOPLE for our own round-up of favorite businesses in the categories of food, home, fashion and beauty

They explained that choosing where to spend your money is a “form of economic protest,” and that shopping from creators of color is an easy (and consistent) way to show support.

“This is an opportunity to strengthen Black businesses and other institutions. It’s a strategy that goes way back in this country, and it’s a simple, uplifting thing that we can all do,” Tayo said at the time. 

More than 75 businesses are currently featured in Magnolia’s virtual vendor fair, listed in alphabetical order on the site. 

On June 18, Chip and Joanna addressed the way their family has been grappling with racism while appearing on an episode of Uncomfortable Conversations with a Black Man, hosted by former NFL player Emmanuel Acho. They were joined by their five kids: sons Crew, 2, Duke, 12, and Drake, 15, and daughters Emmie Kay, 10, and Ella Rose, 13.

"We learn things as kids and it develops us as adults, which is why you all being here with your children is the most powerful thing," Acho explained, "because this conversation could be life-changing — and not necessarily for their lives, but for the life of someone who looks like me."

To help combat systemic racism, consider learning from or donating to these organizations:

  • Campaign Zero (joincampaignzero.org) which works to end police brutality in America through research-proven strategies.
  • ColorofChange.org works to make government more responsive to racial disparities.
  • National Cares Mentoring Movement (caresmentoring.org) provides social and academic support to help black youth succeed in college and beyond.