The expansive residence sits on 1.8 acres and spans 4,500 square feet

By Georgia Slater
December 23, 2020 05:19 PM
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Credit: compass; Mike Coppola/Getty

Candice Bergen and husband Marshall Rose are saying goodbye to their luxury East Hampton home, placing it on the market for $18 million.

The Murphy Brown actress, 74, first moved into the sprawling residence on Lily Pond Lane, one of the most exclusive streets in East Hampton, around her marriage to Rose in 2000.

The cottage-style home was first built for Rose and his first wife in 1986 by Jaque T. Robertson of Cooper Robertson, according to Architectural Digest. In 2004, Bergen hired Robertson to renovate the home.

The expansive dwelling sits on 1.8 acres and spans 4,500 square feet. Inside the main house are five bedrooms and five-and-a-half bathrooms; a guest house behind the main residence has another bedroom and bathroom.

Credit: compass
Credit: compass
Credit: compass

The cedar-shingled cottage includes several communal spaces to entertain, including a dining room, sitting room with a fireplace and another  less formal living room.

The main bedroom suite of the home features a full sitting space, dressing area, a marble bathroom and raised ceilings.

The window-wrapped kitchen provides ample room to cook and eat and includes an overhead hanging rack for pots and pans as well as a large center island.

Credit: compass
Credit: compass

"All the houses on Lily Pond remain in the old-school cottage style. It really feels like you’re in a blast from the past of what East Hampton used to be, which, you only get that in certain areas," said listing agent James Petrie, per the New York Post.

"That’s what people with that kind of money try to get — old-school houses in the best locations."

Credit: compass

The football field-size backyard includes lots of outdoor living space and beautiful gardens. There is also a swimming pool, a large fountain and a covered outdoor dining area.

"The way the whole property lays out is great. The house is pushed up to the front of the property, giving the backyard more space to breathe," Petrie added.