As of Monday morning, there are at least 9,400 confirmed COVID-19 cases in Spain, and more than 300 people have died as a result of the virus

By Jen Juneau
March 16, 2020 11:06 AM
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Madrid residents are coming together in support of the city’s healthcare workers amid the spread of the novel coronavirus (COVID-19) and the lockdown of Spain.

In a recent video shared by The Guardian, people could be heard whistling, clapping and cheering from their homes (and dogs barking along!) in solidarity for the Spanish capital’s doctors, nurses and others working in the healthcare industry.

Spain’s Prime Minister Pedro Sánchez declared a two-week state of emergency Saturday, saying in an address televised across the country of 46 million, “From now we enter into a new phase,” according to the Associated Press.

The AP reports that the country has instated strict rules, where residents may only leave their homes to purchase essentials like food and medicine, go to work, go to the hospital and the like.

“We won’t hesitate in doing what we must to beat the virus. We are putting health first,” said Sánchez, whose wife, Begoña Gómez, tested positive for COVID-19.

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People clap from a balcony in Madrid
Madrid citizens cheer for healthcare workers amid coronavirus lockdown in Spain
| Credit: MARCIAL GUILLEN/EPA-EFE/Shutterstock
Coronavirus map international
Coronavirus map as of Friday, March 13
| Credit: Martin Schwartz/PEOPLE

As of Monday morning, there are said to be at least 9,400 confirmed cases of COVID-19 in Spain, with more than 300 deaths in the country as a result of the virus, according to Johns Hopkins.

Healthcare workers’ support from Madrid’s residents echo events unfolding in Italy as of late, where its citizens are also currently facing tight restrictions under the country’s nationwide lockdown but have been joining together virtually in recent days in song or shows of support with their neighbors.

In one video, which was taken in Siena on Thursday evening, the sounds of many voices singing together could be heard, as local residents made an effort to keep everyone’s spirits high. Footage from Milan, Rome and Naples also showed people on their balconies as they joined together in singing Italy’s national anthem, according to Reuters.

As of Monday morning, Italy has the most confirmed coronavirus cases in Europe at almost 25,000, according to the New York Times. Its number of deaths from the virus is more than 1,800.

coronavirus testing
Testing for coronavirus
| Credit: Mikhail TereshchenkoTASS via Getty

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In the United States, Ohio, Illinois, California, Massachusetts and New York City have issued orders and recommendations over the weekend to close certain gathering places such as restaurants and bars, in an effort to encourage social distancing and combat the spread of the virus.

As of Monday, there have been at least 3,602 confirmed cases of coronavirus and 66 deaths in the U.S., according to the Times. Those most at risk are people over the age of 60, especially those with pre-existing medical conditions.

Despite precautions being taken by retailers, casinos and more, on Sunday night, the National Security Council sent out a message urging Americans not to believe reports that a country-wide quarantine is underway. “Text message rumors of a national #quarantine are FAKE,” they tweeted. “There is no national lockdown.”

Instead, they pointed followers to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, whom they say have provided and “will continue to post the latest guidance on COVID-19.”

As information about the coronavirus pandemic rapidly changes, PEOPLE is committed to providing the most recent data in our coverage. Some of the information in this story may have changed after publication. For the latest on COVID-19, readers are encouraged to use online resources from CDC, WHO, and local public health departments and visit our coronavirus hub.