Kim said that they're "going to get backlash" no matter what they promote

By Julie Mazziotta
April 01, 2019 04:17 PM
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The Kardashian siblings are worth billions thanks to their reality TV show, makeup and clothing lines, and in the case of Kim and Khloé, promotions for teas and shakes that claim to have weight loss benefits.

That last money maker has drawn the repeated ire of The Good Place’s Jameela Jamil, who has called the sisters a “terrible and toxic influence on young girls” for hawking products like Flat Tummy Co.’s appetite suppressing lollipops and meal replacement shakes.

In March, Jamil slammed Khloé after she posted about the shakes on Instagram with a photo of her toned stomach, and claimed that after two weeks of drinking the product “the progress is undeniable.”

Jamil responded, “If you’re too irresponsible to: a) own up to the fact that you have a personal trainer, nutritionist, probable chef, and a surgeon to achieve your aesthetic, rather than this laxative product… And b) tell them the side effects of this NON-FDA approved product, that most doctors are saying aren’t healthy. Side effects such as: Possible Flat Tummy Tea side effects are cramping, stomach pains, diarrhea and dehydration… Then I guess I have to.”

Khloé, 34, addressed Jamil’s comments for the first time on Saturday in an interview with the New York Times, and said that she has never employed a chef and she makes a point to post her workouts on Snapchat for people who can’t afford a personal trainer.

“Well, listen, I am showing you what to do, silly person, 15 repetitions, three times, here’s the move …” Khloé said.

Kim, 38, also spoke out in the interview, adding that they only represent products that they actually use. She also said that she chooses to take on these endorsements for her family, which will grow to five when their fourth child is born later this year.

Jon Kopaloff/FilmMagic; Taylor Hill/FilmMagic

“If there is work that is really easy that doesn’t take away from our kids, that’s like a huge priority, if someone was faced with the same job opportunities, I think they would maybe consider,” she said. “You’re going to get backlash for almost everything so as long as you like it or believe in it or it’s worth it financially, whatever your decision may be, as long as you’re okay with that.”

Their mom Kris Jenner, 63, also weighed in, and said she isn’t bothered by the criticism.

“I don’t live in that negative energy space,” she said “Ninety percent of people will be really excited about the family and the journey and who we are.”

Jamil responded to their comments on Sunday after the interview was published, arguing that the quotes make it clear that they care more about the money than what their endorsements mean for young girls.

“Essentially, ‘f— the young, impressionable people, or those struggling with eating disorders, we want the money.’ I have been given these same opportunities to flog this stuff, and I don’t do it, so they don’t have to,” Jamil said. “Thank you, next.”

She added: “Their pockets are lined with the blood and diarrhea of teenage girls…”

Jamil also pointed out the “irony” that she started her I Weigh movement — where people share their positive attributes that mean more than how much they weigh — after supporting the Kardashians.

“The IRONY that I started ‘I Weigh’ in a post DEFENDING the Kardashians saying they shouldn’t be reduced to nothing more than a number on a weighing scale, and then they spend the next year FLOGGING weight loss products/rhetoric DOES NOT ESCAPE ME,” Jamil tweeted. “It’s quite hilarious.”