The news anchor says she follows the high-protein, low-carb diet to “fuel my busy days”

By Julie Mazziotta
January 08, 2020 11:50 AM
Amy Robach
Roy Rochlin/WireImage

Amy Robach’s days are jam-packed — she’s a co-anchor on 20/20, a mom to five kids and fitness enthusiast — so she focuses on foods that will “fuel my busy days.”

The journalist, 46, finds that the keto diet and intermittent fasting work best for her schedule.

“What and how I eat makes me feel my best and fuels me for busy days as a working mom,” Robach tells PEOPLE.

Robach’s eating schedule also shifts depending on her travel.

“I love getting brunch out with friends, but also like to cook at home with my husband and kids,” she says. “And because I travel frequently for 20/20, I’m always on the lookout for on-the-go healthy options.”

RELATED: Rosario Dawson — and Boyfriend Cory Booker — Stay Full and ‘Energized’ on a Raw Vegan Diet

Read on for a look into one day of Robach’s meals.

Water

88.5 oz.

Breakfast

2 cups of coffee, one black and one with half-and-half

3-egg omelet with ¼ cup ham, ¼ cup cheddar cheese and a handful of green onions

1 cup berries

RELATED: Jenna Dewan Tatum Eats Only Plant-Based Foods (Including French Fries!): What She Eats in a Day

Lunch

Arugula salad with ½ cup cherry tomatoes, ¼ cup buffalo mozzarella, a handful of pine nuts and 2 tbsp. champagne vinaigrette

Snack

1 cup mixed nuts

2 squares dark chocolate

RELATED VIDEO: The Cost of the Keto Diet

Dinner

Butter lettuce salad with 1 sliced avocado, 1 grilled chicken breast and ½ cup green beans

Dessert

1 bite of cheesecake

Total Calories:

2,325

The Verdict:

Robach gets major points right off the bat for her water intake. “Amy drinks plenty of water during the day, which is essential for a high-demand job that involves lots of talking,” says Atlanta-based dietitian Marisa Moore. Robach starts the day with a protein-packed breakfast, complimented by the serving of berries. And that trend continues through the rest of her meals. “Amy does a great job getting in her vegetables at lunch and dinner, and overall includes quality protein, vegetables and healthy fat all day long,” Moore says. “However, it’s lower in carbohydrates, which may impact her energy as the day progresses.” Moore suggests that Robach “check in with her body and energy levels,” and add in healthy carbs if she needs a boost.

NOTE: It is recommended that women eat around 1,600 to 2,400 calories per day, and men eat between 2,000 and 3,000 calories per day.

Advertisement