If you can make a basic boxed cake mix and use a cookie cutter, then you can do it. We promise.

By Ana Calderone
May 24, 2019 12:51 PM
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Flour Shop/Instagram

If you ever need a little pick-me-up, I suggest scrolling through the #explosioncake tagged page on Instagram. The feed is filled with thousands of colorful confections from Amirah Kassem’s Soho-based bakery, Flour Shop.

As the name suggests, the explosion cakes are made with rainbow layers and stuffed with sprinkles that “explode” when you cut out a piece. Kassem’s inspiration for the cheerful treats stems from the piñatas she grew up whacking in her native Mexico, except way more delicious and no stick is required.

While before you had to be a local New Yorker in order to celebrate with one of her explosion cakes, now bakers around the country can recreate them at home with the new Williams-Sonoma x Flour Shop cake kit.

I’m a pretty experienced baker, but the kit, which comes in an adorable paint can and retails for $59.95, really makes it simple for even beginners. If you can make a basic boxed cake mix and use a cookie cutter, then you can do it. I promise.

The kit comes with the cake mix, a frosting mix, two bags of sprinkles, and the best gels to color the rainbow-tinted layers. You will need to get your own cake pans and a 2-inch cookie cutter, if you don’t already have them.

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When you see one of the cut cakes with sprinkles cascading down the layers, it looks intimidated to recreate. But all it really requires is cutting out the middle of five of the layers, stacking them, pouring the sprinkles inside the tunnel you just created, and then topping it with the last, whole layer.

If you’re having a tough time visualizing it coming together, check out my video above. I used only pink and blue layers because I was bringing it to a friend’s baby shower. My friend isn’t finding out the sex of her baby (hence both colors), but it would make for a great sex-reveal cake if you dyed all the layers pink or blue.

The only downside I found from mastering the explosion cake, is that any other future creation will have a tough time measuring up.

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