By peoplestaff225
Updated December 08, 2020 01:40 PM
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You don’t have to have restaurant experience on your resume to know working in food can be grueling: The long hours, a never-ending stream of activity, and snide back talk from customers is enough to drive anyone crazy. But perhaps not quite as crazy as the chefs that fill the pages of Get Jiro! become.

Written nearly three years ago by chef Anthony Bourdain and Joel Rose (with illustrations by Langdon Foss), Get Jiro! is a graphic novel that tells the story of Jiro Ono, a fictional sushi chef who wields his kitchen knives for much more than chopping raw fish in a dystopian Los Angeles.

Despite the shared name and profession, this Jiro Ono shouldn’t be confused with the real-life one, who served as the subject of critical favorite documentary Jiro Dreams of Sushi. Rather than making award-winning sushi, this Ono must survive in a dog-eat-dog culinary world where murder is an acceptable tactic to secure a table at a restaurant.

RELATED: Anthony Bourdain Wants to Be Remembered as ‘Not Such a Bad Bastard After All’

The first installment of Get Jiro! was a huge success, landing the number one spot on the New York Times‘s Hardcover Graphic Books list in July 2012. As such, Tuesday, Grub Street reported that Vertigo, the graphic novel’s publisher, has commissioned a prequel to be titled Get Jiro: Blood and Sushi. Like the original, authors Bourdain and Rose will be back to pen Get Jiro: Blood and Sushi, and illustrations will be done by veteran comic artist Alé Garza.

Get Jiro!‘s prequel is set years before Jiro Ono takes Los Angeles in the 2012 novel. Instead, readers will see him back as an aspiring chef in Tokyo. The graphic novel will detail Ono’s struggle to balance his double life: Half lived as a training chef, and half as a key player in his father’s mob.

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The Parts Unknown host shared a snap of the upcoming book’s cover on Instagram, and it looks to be filled with just as much gore as the first, if the decapitated heads sitting alongside sashimi is any indication. It may not give you much of an appetite, but it’s sure to satisfy your taste for adventure.

—Diana Pearl