Phoenix Coldon's parents are still seeking answers in the disappearance of their daughter, who was musically talented and a fencing champion

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Credit: Facebook

On Dec. 18, 2011, after 23-year-old Phoenix Coldon attended church, she backed her SUV out of the driveway of her family’s home in Spanish Lake, Missouri.

Coldon hasn’t been seen since. Hours after she disappeared, her vehicle was reportedly found abandoned but running in a crime-ridden section of East St. Louis. Coldon’s glasses, purse, shoes and ID were all inside.

Nearly seven years later, Coldon’s parents, Goldia and Lawrence, are still haunted by their daughter’s disappearance — which they believed wasn’t treated with enough urgency by both law enforcement and the news media, in part because Coldon was black. Their quest for answers is the subject of a new two-part series on Oxygen, The Disappearance of Phoenix Coldon, airing Nov. 3 and Nov. 4 at 7 p.m. ET/PT, an exclusive clip of which was obtained by PEOPLE.

“The news media wouldn’t give us the time of day,” Goldia says in the clip, shown below. “If Phoenix had looked like Natalee Holloway, we would not have had this problem.”

The series follows investigative reporter Shawndrea Thomas and retired police officer Joe Delia as they attempt to unravel the mysterious unsolved case.

Months after she vanished, Coldon’s parents described her to the St. Louis Post-Dispatch in 2012 as deeply religious, quiet, inquisitive and talented. A local junior fencing champion, Coldon excelled in music, playing the guitar, violin and piano.

Reflecting on the day Coldon went missing, Lawrence told the outlet, “At midnight, my wife said something was wrong.” He added, “It was kind of out of character for Phoenix to go out without telling us.”

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Numerous published reports have chronicled the parents’ attempts to find their daughter, including launching a Facebook page dedicated to the cause. According to the Huffington Post, they have even visited exotic dance clubs and spoke with local prostitutes because of the possibility Coldon might have been forced into the sex trade.

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Phoenix Coldon
| Credit: Facebook

The family has also reportedly been the target of hoaxes — including a young woman who called the family home pretending to be Coldon.

The Post-Dispatch reported that the home Coldon disappeared from had fallen into foreclosure because the family’s funding of search efforts.

“Let them take the house. I don’t care,” Goldia told the paper. “All I want to know is where Phoenix is.”

The Disappearance of Phoenix Coldon airs Nov. 3 and Nov. 4 (7 p.m. ET) on Oxygen.