Janet Tyburski enlisted the help of her other daughter, an Oberlin College student, to move the body

By Jeff Truesdell
April 06, 2017 04:03 PM

 

An Ohio woman who confessed to suffocating her daughter who suffered from bipolar disorder and then enlisting another daughter to help dump the body in a field was sentenced Wednesday to 19 years to life in prison, according to multiple reports.

Janet Tyburski, 47, of Lakewood, pleaded guilty and was sentenced under a plea deal for convictions of murder, felonious assault, tampering with evidence and abuse of a corpse in the death of her 26-year-old daughter, Rachele, reports Cleveland.com.

Her former mother-in-law, Danusia Tyburski, said Janet had struggled raising three daughters alone after Janet’s husband died in a car accident in 1999, and that the mental health of Rachele, then 8, deteriorated and made her at times violent, according Cleveland.com.

“When my son was alive, they were all so happy,” Danusia Tyburski told Fox8.

Lorain County Sheriff's Office

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Janet was living with Rachele and helping to care for Rachele’s 4-year-old son in 2015. But things grew tough when Janet lost her job early that year, Danusia Tyburski told the station.

Authorities say Janet suffocated Rachele on March 13, 2015, during a struggle at their home. Two days later, she enlisted the help of her other daughter, Hannah Tyburski, then a student at Oberlin College, to move the body to a field, where it was discovered behind a snow bank on March 15, 2015.

Evidence of blunt-force trauma to the victim’s head and chest likely weren’t fatal, and appeared to result from a struggle before Rachele was suffocated, according to Lorain County Coroner Dr. Stephen Evans, reports Cleveland.com

Danusia Tyburski said that Janet told her she “put a pillow over Rachele’s face.”

“She said, ‘I’m so sorry,'” Danusia told Fox8. “She didn’t know what to do.”

Hannah, 21, faces charges of obstructing justice and abuse of a corpse, but a plea deal is under consideration that would allow her to plead guilty to one count of the latter, which is a misdemeanor, according to The Chronicle

“It is not our intention to seek any other charges with respect to her now or in the future,” said Lorain County Assistant Prosecutor Paul Griffin, The Chronicle reports.

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Calls by PEOPLE to Griffin and to Janet Tyburski’s defense attorney, Nicholas Hanek, were not immediately returned.

In court Wednesday, Janet Tyburski said, “My actions were just egregious. Taking my daughter’s body — I was not in my right mind — and placing her in a field in North Ridgeville. For getting my other daughter — who was just going about her business in college — and involving her in helping to move her sister’s body.”

“I so sincerely apologize to my family, friends, neighbors, the Lakewood community and the North Ridgeville community for putting them through this trial — this mess,” she said.

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