'He's basically drowning his sorrows in food and gaining a lot of weight,' Jimmy Nigg, Jr. tells PEOPLE

By Chris Harris and Greg Hanlon
Updated March 18, 2016 12:15 AM
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Michael Conroy/AP

Jared Fogle, the disgraced former Subway subway spokesman currently imprisoned for child sex abuse, has gained a significant amount of weight in prison, two sources tell PEOPLE.

Jimmy Nigg, Jr., the nephew of Steven Nigg, the 60-year-old man who allegedly attacked Fogle and bloodied his nose in prison in January, tells PEOPLE that Fogle has gained between 20 and 30 pounds since the start of his sentence last November.

“He’s basically drowning his sorrows in food and gaining a lot of weight,” Nigg says.

Nigg says that Fogle uses his money to buy food unavailable to other prisoners. He says he buys ice cream, often Nestle Drumsticks, “two or three times a day.” He adds that he can specially request some meals, and that he often pays for fish meals unavailable to most other prisoners.

Nigg’s account of Fogle’s weight gain squares with that of Larry Levine, a prison consultant and former federal prison inmate who helps people get through the experience of prison and has a number of clients incarcerated with Fogle at Colorado’s Englewood Prison.

According to Levine, Fogle has been assigned to work in the prison’s kitchen, which served submarine sandwiches about two months ago.

“The prison guards made Jared work the line, so he was serving the sandwiches to the other inmates,” Levine alleges. “They were all razzing him as they went down the sandwich line, going, ‘Thanks for the six-inch, jackass.'”

Sources: Fogle ‘a Target’ in Prison, Pays for Protection

Both Nigg and Levine say that Fogle is disliked among fellow inmates.

Levine tells PEOPLE, “He’s been slapped around fairly consistently since the start of his sentence it just hasn’t been reported.”

He adds, “He’s had several inmates warn him to keep away, and he’s been threatened that if he says anything about being roughed up, they’ll get to him.”

According to Nigg, Fogle pays other prisoners money to physically protect him.

“He’ll always have one or two guys with him at a time,” Nigg says.

Nigg says that Fogle is able to pay prisoners by having “someone on the outside” send money to a federal address in Iowa, where federal prisoners can access money.

According to Nigg, Fogle’s money is not the only reason allegedly disliked by fellow inmates. “He’s not liked by inmates who aren’t child molesters and child predators,” says Nigg. “And he’s also disliked by the child molesters who are serving 40 year sentences who are upset that he only got 15.”

Last November, Fogle was sentenced to serve 15 years, 8 months in prison after pleading guilty to possession of child pornography and traveling across state lines to have sex with a minor.

According to the government’s pre-sentencing filing, “Fogle went to great lengths to engage in commercial sex acts with underage minors.” It adds that “he continually communicated with the prostituted minors in his attempts to find even younger children for sex. He specified the ages he wanted, including 14- and 15 year-olds.”

Nigg says that his uncle allegedly beat up Fogle because he was angry with what he believes was a relatively light prison sentence for Fogle: “I think he did it to show guys that no matter how much money he has, he can’t do what he did to people and get away with it,” Nigg says.

On Wednesday, Nigg’s father, also named Jimmy, told PEOPLE that his brother Steven “just can’t be around child molesters. He doesn’t like them.”

Jimmy Nigg Jr. says Steven is currently in solitary confinement and has been told by prison officials that he will lose his so-called “good time,” which will likely mean he will have to serve a longer portion of his sentence.

On Wednesday, the U.S. Bureau of Prisons would not confirm the assault or punishment “based on the need to ensure safety and security in our institutions and in accordance with legal requirements including the Privacy Act,” a spokesman said.

The bureau did not return PEOPLE’s calls for comment about Fogle on Thursday.