He and his mother convicted in August on second-degree charges of conspiracy and theft by deception, after their October 2013 indictment

By Adam Carlson
Updated October 03, 2015 03:15 PM
Advertisement
Clem Murray/The Philadelphia Inquirer via AP

Irving Fryar, a pastor and former No. 1 NFL draft pick, was sentenced to five years in prison for his role in a $1.2 million fraudulent mortgage loan scheme he ran with his mother, the New Jersey Attorney General said Friday.

Fryar, 52, was sentenced Friday. His mother, Allene McGhee, 74, was sentenced to three years’ probation.

The two were convicted in August on second-degree charges of conspiracy and theft by deception, after their October 2013 indictment.

“This was not a situation where Fryar and his mother simply made a few misrepresentations on a mortgage application; they participated in an elaborate and devious scheme to defraud seven banks of more than $1 million,” Elie Honig, director of the Division of Criminal Justice, said in a statement. “This was a major theft case, and it rightfully has landed Fryar in state prison.”

Fryar and McGhee conspired to get six home equity loans totaling more than $690,000 between Dec. 18 and Dec. 21, 2009, using McGhee’s home as the collateral, the state said. A seventh loan was fraudulently obtained for Fryar’s home.

William Barksdale, a partner in the scheme, was the key witness at trial, according to Deadspin, and is serving 20 months. But the defense argued that Barksdale was a con-artist.

McGhee subsequently lost her home to foreclosure following the scheme, according to Deadspin, which the state said netted Fryar more than $200,000.

Their next court date is set for Nov. 9, to determine proper restitution.

Fryar played in the NFL from 1984-2000. During that time he played for the Miami Dolphins, Philadelphia Eagles and the New England Patriots.

He was the pastor of a New Jersey church he also founded, the state said.

Want to keep up with the latest crime coverage? Click here to get breaking crime news, ongoing trial coverage and details of intriguing unsolved cases in the True Crime Newsletter.