"Our sadness and shock at this loss is profound," reads a statement from the university about the slayings of Dr. Beth Potter and her husband, Robin Carre

By Chris Harris
April 02, 2020 04:55 PM
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Authorities have identified the couple who were found murdered in a ditch on the University of Wisconsin campus as a respected physician with ties to the school and her 57-year-old husband.

PEOPLE confirms Dr. Beth Potter, 52, and her husband, Robin Carre, were the two individuals found dead Tuesday morning at the University of Wisconsin Arboretum, located on the Madison campus.

Medical examiners have determined both died from homicidal trauma.

The slain couple were found by a jogger at around 6:30 a.m., police said.

According to a statement from the school, Dr. Potter worked at the Wingra Family Medical Center run by the Access Community Health Centers and the University of Wisconsin’s Department of Family Medicine and Community Health.

Carre was pronounced dead at the scene, while Potter survived just long enough to get to the hospital, where she died from her injuries.

A statement from the University of Wisconsin-Madison Police Department confirms “officers and investigators have worked around the clock to canvas the neighborhood, follow up on leads, and talk to individuals who may have information about the homicides.”

Investigators “believe the incident was targeted and not a random act,” the statement adds, before urging those with information to come forward by calling the Madison Area Crime Stoppers at (608) 266-6014 or by submitting a tip online through P3 Tips.

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The statement from the school notes Potter was also an associate professor in the Department of Family Medicine and Community Health.

“Our sadness and shock at this loss is profound,” reads the statement. “We honor the passion and commitment she brought to the health of her patients and her fellow health care professionals. We also grieve the loss of her husband, Robin Carre, whose life was claimed by the same tragedy.”

In the statement, Dr. William Schwab, professor and interim chair at UW-Madison’s Department of Family Medicine and Community Health, said the following: “In addition to being a wonderful family physician and highly respected teacher, Beth was a dedicated leader at the Wingra clinic and in our health system. She was wise, warm, and always supportive. There are so many in our department whose lives have been touched by Beth; her loss will weigh heavily within us.”