The company is based in the home of the lead investigator for Anthony's 2011 trial defense team

By Harriet Sokmensuer
December 31, 2020 11:49 AM
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Joe Burbank/Orlando Sentinel/MCT/Landov

Casey Anthony has filed paperwork to open a private investigation company in South Florida, according to reports.

Anthony, who was famously acquitted of murder in 2011 in the death of her 2-year-old daughter, Caylee, filed documents on Dec. 14 listing herself as a registered agent of Case Research & Consulting Services, LLC, WKMG, Fox35 and the Orlando Sentinel reports.

The business is registered to a home in West Palm Beach owned by Patrick McKenna, who was Anthony's lead investigator for her defense team in her 2011 trial. According to state records, she does not have a Florida private investigator’s license.

Anthony was charged with first-degree murder for the 2008 disappearance of Caylee, who was missing for 31 days before Anthony’s mother, Cindy, reported her missing. After a massive search for the missing toddler, the girl’s remains were found in a wooded lot less than one-third of a mile from the Anthony family home.

Her 2011 trial was a media circus, with at least 40 million people watching at least some of the testimony, according to Nielsen Research. Anthony was acquitted of murder and manslaughter charges on July 5, 2011 — but convicted of four counts of lying to police.

After her acquittal, she was described by a Florida Department of Corrections spokeswoman as “one of the most hated women in America” — a moniker that stuck.

Image #: 14560325 Casey Anthony stands in the courtroom during her murder trial at the Orange County Courthouse in Orlando, Florida, Wednesday, June 22, 2011. (Red Huber/Orlando Sentinel/MCT) Orlando Sentinel/ MCT /LANDOV us news missinggirl 6 os
FBI; Landov

Since her acquittal. Anthony has tried to keep a low profile, living with and working for McKenna. However, in 2018, she made headlines when she said that she was releasing a racy film about her life.

“She’s going to have total editorial control,” an insider told PEOPLE at the time. “And she’s going to push the envelope. She wants everyone to talk about this movie, and then she’ll never speak publicly about her life — or Caylee’s death — ever again.”

But the film never happened. A source close to the production told PEOPLE that a multitude of factors —including COVID-19— derailed the process.