The American woman once jailed for her roommate's murder will speak at a conference about wrongly accused criminal defendants

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May 08, 2019 06:15 PM

Amanda Knox is returning to Italy.

Knox, 31, will return to the country for the first time since she was convicted and imprisoned — but later acquitted — of the murder of her roommate, Meredith Kercher.

She will be attending a conference that will be organized by Italy Innocence Project, an organization that helps people who have been convicted of crimes they did not commit. She will speak about the role of the media in criminal proceedings.

Knox announced the upcoming appearance on Twitter.

“The Italy Innocence Project didn’t yet exist when I was wrongly convicted in Perugia,” she wrote. “I’m honored to accept their invitation to speak to the Italian people at this historic event and return to Italy for the first time.”

Knox expressed a desire to return to Italy during a 2017 interview with PEOPLE. “Perugia is probably the least welcome place for me in the entire world,” she told PEOPLE. “And that’s scary. But the only way that I’m going to come full circle is by physically, literally, coming full circle.”

Knox was an American student studying abroad in Perugia in 2007 when she was accused of brutally murdering her roommate, Meredith Kercher, who was found dead in her bedroom on November 2. It was a dramatic case that saw controversial twists for years to come.

Knox and her then-boyfriend, Raffaele Sollecito, were both convicted for the murder of Kercher, 21, a British exchange student who lived with Knox in Perugia. Prosecutors alleged the crime had taken place during a sex game run amok, though hard evidence against the young couple was scant.

Knox and Sollecito spent four years in prison before their convictions were overturned in 2011. However, the pair were convicted again in absentia in 2013 before being acquitted again in 2015.

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Amanda Friedman

Related: Amanda Knox, Four Years After Acquittal: Her Life Today

“I am tremendously relieved and grateful for the decision of the Supreme Court of Italy,” Knox said when her conviction was definitively overturned by Italy’s highest court on March 27, 2015, according to the New York Times. “The knowledge of my innocence has given me strength in the darkest times of this ordeal.”

In January 2019, the European Court of Human Rights ordered Italy to pay $20,000 in damages to Knox for failing to provide her legal assistance during her initial questioning after Kercher’s murder, according to the AP.

Rudy Guede, a Perugia-based bartender, is currently serving a 16-year sentence for Kercher’s murder.

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