Amanda Knox's Netflix Documentary: 5 Things We Learned About Her Case

The new Netflix documentary about Amanda Knox's murder case includes exclusive interviews and several revelations

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Photo: Source: Netflix US & Canada/YouTube

When it comes to salacious murder cases, few can come close to the saga of Amanda Knox.

Knox and her then-boyfriend, Raffaele Sollecito, were charged with the 2007 death of 21-year-old British student Meredith Kercher, who was sexually assaulted and found fatally stabbed in the Italian apartment she shared with Knox. Both were convicted after police said DNA evidence linked them to the crime – but they were acquitted in 2015 by Italy’s highest court because of “stunning flaws” in the investigation and a lack of evidence.

In between their first conviction and final appeal, Knox and Sollecito were acquitted and convicted again in Kercher’s death.

The new Netflix documentary Amanda Knox, which was released Friday, explores the eight-year saga from the inside out, with exclusive interviews with Knox, Sollecito and lead Italian prosecutor Giuliano Mignini.

Here are five things we learned from watching it.

1. Knox and Sollecito Met Five Days Before the Murder

Sollecito, who now runs his own Internet business and serves as a true crime expert for Italian television, describes in the documentary how his life revolved around PlayStation before he met Knox at a concert five days before the murder.

“I showed her a beautiful panorama of Perugia that was for me romantic,” he says.

Knox was equally smitten. However, their love story was cut short when both of them were found guilty of Kercher’s murder and tossed in prison.

Sollecito says he spent six months in solitary confinement and was depressed after his break-up with Knox.

“She clearly told me her feelings were completely changed,” he says. “This moment was kind of bitter, even though I knew her only five days. The five days were everything.”

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2. Knox Had a Major Meltdown at the Crime Scene

Two days after the murder, Italian police brought Knox back to the crime scene and asked her to look through the knife drawer to see if she could figure out if any of their knives were missing.

Mignini says Knox had an epic meltdown and began hitting the palms of her hands on her ears.

“It hit me all at once and I became hysterical,” Knox explains in the documentary.

For Mignini, he says he saw it as a sign of her guilt: “Undoubtedly I started to suspect Amanda.”

3. Knox Contemplated Suicide

Knox admits in the documentary that she had thoughts of suicide while she was incarcerated for four years in Italy’s Capanne prison.

“Suddenly I found myself tossed into this dark place,” she says. “I thought about suicide. I thought about all the ways I could do it. Me not coming home again until I am in my 50s, until members of my family have died. I was poisoned.”

4. Prosecutor Giuliano Mignini Is a Sherlock Holmes Fan

In the documentary, Mignini says the iconic British sleuth professionally inspired him.

A self-described fan of crime stories, Mignini also explains that he suspected Knox in Kercher’s case for several reasons. One, he says, he was convinced that a broken window at the crime scene was staged to make it look like a break-in.

He says he also came to the conclusion that a woman must have been involved in Kercher’s slaying because “a woman who has killed tends to cover the body of female victims,” he said. “A man would never think to do this.”

(A comforter was found covering Kercher’s body.)

5. Kercher’s Mother Asked for Permission to Kiss Her Dead Daughter

Kercher’s mother, Arline, asked Mignini to see the body of her daughter, according to the documentary.

As a father of four girls, Mignini says he understood the pain she was in. “I remember she was absorbed in silence,” he says.

“And then she made a gesture. She asked if she could give her a kiss.”

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