The musician opened up about his wife's struggle with cancer in an interview with Today

By Andrea Park
Updated January 16, 2016 02:50 PM
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Rory Feek took a break from blogging about his wife’s fight with terminal cervical cancer to talk to Today about the family’s struggles.

In the interview with Today, which was published Friday, Feek reveals that his upcoming album with wife Joey will be incredibly meaningful to the both of them.

“This album is so special to us, especially Joey,” he says. “It’s filled with songs that she grew singing in church and her mother sang to her all through her childhood.”

Feek, 49, continues, “It’s the last album we will ever make and the last songs that we will ever sing together. That makes it very, very special to Joey and me.”

The Feeks, as country duo Joey + Rory, recently received a Grammy Award nomination for best country duo/group performance. Although Feek knows how he’d like to celebrate if they win at the awards show in February, he admits that he and Joey, 40, are taking things one day at a time.

“I’d love to be here holding Joey’s hand, watching the show on TV … and if they called our names as the winner, I want to be able to lean over, look into her eyes and say, ‘Congratulations, honey,’ and give her a long, slow kiss,” he says. “But God only knows where we will be in a month.”

He adds, “I can tell you though … win or lose, together or separated by fate … Joey will be right beside me then and every moment before and after that day. If not in person, then in my heart. Always.”

Feek, who is father to 22-month-old daughter Indiana with Joey, also shares how music has been a major source of strength during the family’s difficult past year.

“Some days when Joey feels good, she will still sing to Indy. ‘Itsy Bitsy Spider,’ ‘Pat-a-Cake, Pat-a-Cake’ or a hymn,” he says. “And for a few minutes, Joey isn’t a woman dying of cancer connected to a machine with morphine … she’s a mother connected to her baby by love.”

Joey underwent multiple surgeries, including a hysterectomy, and chemotherapy and radiation treatment after being diagnosed in May 2014. She recently decided to stop further treatment and is now under hospice care at home in Indiana.