March 13, 2018 01:02 PM

Latin trap sensation Bad Bunny who was born Benito Antonio Martínez Ocasio in Puerto Rico, recently teamed up with Apple Music to create an exclusive short documentary that followed the reggaetonero back to his native island post Hurricane Maria, which ravaged the U.S. territory in September of last year.

In the short film, which highlights the fortitude of his family and how his roots influence his creativity, fans get an intimate look at the artist’s personal journey to musical success with interviews with his close friends and family, including his mother. The rapper reflects on his early years, working small jobs — cleaning computers and bagging groceries at a supermarket — saying that the struggle inherit in earning little money doing unrewarding work only motivated him to work harder. “All I wanted was for my shift to end so I could go home,” he joked to PEOPLE CHICA. “It was really motivating….because you never really want to be doing that. All you want is to reach your dreams and earn money doing what you like.”

However, the rapper seized his moments working the checkout line: “It served as motivation when it came to making music,” he said. “There were also a lot of songs that I started creating while working [at the supermarket.] I would write songs outside or in my mind and then I would sing them multiple times throughout my shift to just remember the lyrics.”

Bad Bunny

The “Soy Peor” rapper also shared how he got the name Bad Bunny.  “It originated because of a photo from when I was a kid,” the 24-year-old said. “That’s what I called myself on social media and when I was choosing an artistic name, it just stuck.”

His career continues it’s swift ascent. After scoring 17 hits on the Billboard’s Hot Latin Songs chart in 2017 alone, he’s been touring the U.S. with guest appearances from J. Balvin and Becky G and is rumored to be releasing music with megastars Jennifer Lopez and Drake.

He hopes his success will inspire others to pursue their goals and dedicates his tour, “La Nueva Religion,” to others pursuing their passions: “They just go after their dreams, and they are making it happening, just like I did. The young Latinos who are working towards progress.”

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