The two stepped out together at a star-studded dinner honoring Japanese Prime Minister Shinzo Abe

By Tierney McAfee
April 28, 2015 08:25 PM
Olivier Douliery/Getty

Though less flashy than Saturday night’s White House Correspondents’ Dinner, the Obamas’ Japanese state dinner at the White House on Tuesday still boasted some big names – including Seattle Seahawks quarterback Russell Wilson and his rumored love interest Ciara.

Wilson brought his grandmother to the White House Correspondents’ Dinner on Saturday, so perhaps this was his way of making it up to the singer, who he was photographed holding hands with. When asked where his grandmother was, Wilson said, “She’s back in Virginia.”

The stars were given the opportunity to rub elbows with some of the most powerful politicians on the planet at the special dinner honoring Japanese Prime Minister Shinzo Abe and his wife, Akie Abe.

Also in attendance were Scandal showrunner Shonda Rhimes, Star Trek alum George Takei, U.S. Ambassador to Japan Caroline Kennedy, Vice President Joe Biden and wife Jill Biden, and of course, the hosts with the most, President Obama and Michelle Obama.

Takei told reporters he wouldn’t have any trouble handling his meal, saying, “I grew up with chopsticks.” His husband, Brad Takei, on the other hand, was “not very good with it,” he added.

Russell Wilson holds hands with Ciara
Getty

Guests feasted on a decadent dinner created by Iron Chef Masaharu Morimoto and White House chef Cris Comerford, and it was served on the brand-new White House china service designed by the First Lady.

From left: Japan's first lady Akie Abe, Michelle Obama, Japanese Prime Minister Shinzo Abe and President Barack Obama
Mandel Ngan/AFP/Getty

“For Michelle and myself, this is an opportunity to return the hospitality that Shinzo, Akie and the Japanese people have shown us in the past,” President Obama said upon welcoming the prime minister and his wife to the White House Monday morning. “In Kyoto, Michelle had the honor of playing taiko drums. In Tokyo, I played soccer with ASIMO the robot.”

“Today is also a chance for Americans, especially our young people, to say thank you for all the things we love from Japan,” he added. “Like karate and karaoke. Manga and anime. And, of course, emojis.”

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