The singer-songwriter shared the story behind the song

By Char Adams
Updated January 08, 2016 01:45 PM
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Taylor Swift said her hit “Blank Space” was a response to years of being dubbed a “psycho serial dater girl” by the media.

The singer-songwriter, 26, performed an acoustic version of the song in an intimate performance at the Grammy Museum’s Clive Davis Theater in September, but not without a revealing introduction.

“In the last couple of years the media have had a really wonderful fixation on, kind of, painting me as like the ‘psycho serial dater girl.’ It’s been awesome. I loved it,” Swift joked.

“Every article was like, ‘Taylor Swift standing near some guy. Watch out, guy!’ Every single article had these descriptions of my personality that were very different from the actual personality.” She added that she was initially “bummed” by how she was portrayed in the media, “but then my second reaction ended up being like, ‘Hey, that’s actually kind of a really interesting character they’re writing about.'”

With that, the vindictive girlfriend Swift portrayed in the song’s riveting music video was born.

“She jet-sets around the world collecting men! And she can get any of them, but she’s so clingy that they leave and she cries and then she gets another one in her web!” the singer said. “And she traps them and locks them in her mansion and then she’s crying in her marble bathtub surrounded by pearls.”

Swift uploaded the video to her YouTube account on Thursday. The video’s description describes the performance as a mini concert to celebrate Swift’s “record-breaking attendance” exhibit at the museum.

The “Bad Blood” singer donned an all-black ensemble as she performed with only a guitar.

In an October interview with NME, Swift said that she often felt the media’s portrayal of her love life wasn’t rooted in reality, but she admitted that the coverage intrigued her as much as the next reader.

So, she decided to bring the imaginary persona to life in the video for “Blank Space.” It seems the tabloid persona of her love life did some good.

“[The song] was number one for like eight or nine weeks, so I have no complaints as to how things turned out.”