June 06, 2016 09:00 PM

Hillary Clinton earned enough delegates to become the presumptive Democratic nominee on Monday, which has made her the first ever woman to win a major party nomination, the Associated Press reports.

According to the AP count, a combination of pledged and superdelegates put Clinton over the mark in her contest against Vermont Sen. Bernie Sanders.

Clinton tweeted about the news, insisting she still has a way to go, saying: “We are on the brink of a historic moment, but we still have work to do.”

While Clinton was “flattered” by the news, she still acknowledged the last push her campaign needs to solidify her nomination.

Sanders campaign released a statement of their own, making it obvious that he was unenthused by the announcement.

“It is unfortunate that the media, in a rush to judgement, are ignoring the Democratic National Committee’s clear statement that it is wrong to count the votes of super delegates before they actually vote at the convention this summer,” Sanders’ spokesperson Michael Briggs said in a statement obtained by PEOPLE.

“Secretary Clinton does not have and will not have the requisite number of pledged delegates to secure the nomination,” the statement continued. “She will be depending on super delegate who do not vote until July 25 and who can change their minds between now and then. They include more than 400 super delegates who endorsed Secretary Clinton 10 months before the first caucuses and primaries and long before any other candidate was in the race.

“Our job from now until the convention is to convince those super delegates that Bernie is by far the strongest candidate against Donald Trump.”

Although Sanders is holding strong to his commitment to not drop out of the race until absolutely necessary, Politico reports that in order for him to bypass Clinton in delegates, between Tuesday’s primaries and next week’s contest in Washington D.C., he needs to win nearly two-thirds of pledged delegates.

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