Hillary Clinton drew a huge round of applause from the crowd when she confronted a heckler at a town hall meeting in New Hampshire Sunday
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Hillary Clinton had no time for a Republican state representative who heckled her about former President Bill Clinton‘s sex scandals during a town hall meeting in New Hampshire on Sunday.

After Katherine Prudhomme O’Brien, a GOP state representative from Rockingham, repeatedly interrupted the Democratic front-runner in an attempt to question her about her husband’s alleged sexual misconduct, Hillary finally fired back, “You are very rude, and I’m not going to ever call on you,” drawing a huge round of applause from the crowd.

According to CNN, O’Brien said after the event that she had been trying to confront the former secretary of state about allegations that her husband had sexually assaulted Juanita Broaddrick and Kathleen Willey.

“I asked her how in the world she can say that Juanita Broaddrick and Kathleen Willey are lying when she has no idea who Juanita Broaddrick is,” O’Brien told reporters. “[Hillary] told me this summer she doesn’t know who [Broaddrick] is and doesn’t want to know who she is. How can she assess that they are lying, which she told someone last month?”

Hillary – whose husband campaigned on her behalf in Nashua, New Hampshire, Monday morning, for the first time in her 2016 campaign – spoke out in support of rape victims in 2015, saying they “have the right to be believed.”

“Today I want to send a message to every survivor of sexual assault,” she said at a rally in Iowa in September. “Don’t let anyone silence your voice. You have the right to be heard. You have the right to be believed and we’re with you.”

But some critics, including many Republicans, have labeled Hillary’s comments hypocritical.

“She says that rape victims should be believed,” O’Brien said. “I agree with her, that is true, they should be believed and we should assess what they are saying; she doesn’t even want to assess it.”

Last month, Hillary also faced questions about Broaddrick, Willey and Paula Jones, who have all accused her husband of sexual impropriety. “I would say that everyone should be believed at first until they are disbelieved based on evidence,” she responded before moving on to other questions.

But as the 2016 race ramps up, it seems unlikely that the Democratic hopeful will be able to continue brushing off the sex scandals surrounding her husband – at least, not if Donald Trump can help it.

The GOP front-runner has launched an attack on the Clintons, saying Bill is “fair game” and claiming Hillary was complicit in the former president’s alleged abuse of women.

“She’s married to a person that’s a serious abuser and I mean, at the highest level and she’s not an innocent victim,” Trump said Sunday on Fox & Friends. “She was the one that would go along with him in this whole game that they play. And you look at what happened with some of the people that he took advantage of and then she gets involved. So she’s not like the innocent person sitting by the side with tears in her eyes. She was very much involved.”

As former President Clinton campaigned Monday, he, too, was confronted by the question – by ABC News – of whether his past is fair game in his wife’s race.

Appearing flustered for a moment, Clinton replied: “The Republicans have to decide who they want to nominate.”

Most of the other presidential hopefuls seem to be steering clear of the allegations against Bill – and faulting Trump for raising the issue.

Vermont Sen. Bernie Sanders said on CNN‘s State of the Union Sunday that Trump should focus on climate change and improving worker wages rather than “Bill Clinton’s sex life.”

And while GOP hopeful Carly Fiorina agreed that Bill is “fair game,” she said attacking the former president won’t hurt Hillary.

The only way to defeat her is “by attacking her track record and her lack of trustworthiness,” Fiorina said on Fox & Friends last month.