Jason Doré, executive director of the Louisiana GOP, spent $175.98 on the website, according to the hackers' database

By Tierney McAfee
Updated August 21, 2015 08:00 PM
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Credit: Lee Jin-man/AP

Josh Duggar isn’t the only high-profile figure to be exposed in the recent Ashley Madison hack.

Among the millions of alleged subscribers are thousands of government workers and politicians, including a Louisiana GOP official who says he joined Ashley Madison, a dating website for people seeking extramarital affairs, for work – to do political “opposition research.”

The hackers’ database shows Jason Doré, the executive director of the Louisiana GOP, spent $175.98 on the site. While he acknowledges his name is on the list released by hackers earlier this week, he tells The Times-Picayune, “As the state’s leading opposition research firm, our law office routinely searches public records, online databases and websites of all types to provide clients with comprehensive reports.”

Opening the account “ended up being a waste of money and time,” he adds.

The Pentagon announced Thursday it is investigating the more than 13,000 military email addresses used to create accounts on the infidelity website, the AP reports. Adultery is a crime that can be punishable by dishonorable discharge or even jail time under the Uniform Code of Military Justice.

Defense Secretary Ash Carter says, “I’m aware of it. Of course it’s an issue because conduct is very important. And we expect good conduct on the part of our people. … The services are looking into it and as well they should be. Absolutely.”

More than 15,000 of the email addresses included in the data dump were hosted on government and military servers, although it’s unclear how many of the accounts are real, Politico reports.

Hundreds of government employees with jobs in the White House, Congress and law enforcement agencies used Internet connections in federal offices to access the site, according to the AP.

A Justice Department investigator who spoke to the AP on condition of anonymity admits, “I was going some things I shouldn’t have been doing.”