Country Stars' Surprising Second Jobs

Who designs shoes? Owns a bar? Meet the musical acts who work way longer than 9 to 5

01 of 08

JASON ALDEAN & LUKE BRYAN

JASON ALDEAN & LUKE BRYAN
Courtesy Buck Commander

Hunting Equipment Store Proprietors
Two of the hottest singers on the country scene don't just tour together – they sell deer-hunting equipment together, too! Aldean and Bryan own Buck Commander, a retail and online store that's been such a hit, it's also featured on a reality show on the Outdoor Channel. The pals, who call themselves Buckmen, are so into their business, they both have the company's logo tattooed on their arms.

02 of 08

TRISHA YEARWOOD

TRISHA YEARWOOD
Neilson Barnard/Getty

Cooking Show Host amp Cookbook Author
Since 2012, Yearwood has been whipping up family recipes on Trisha's Southern Kitchen, a Food Network show that snagged an Emmy in its first year. The Georgia native has also authored two best-selling cookbooks; a third title is on the way. Food, she says, isn't so different from music: "You eat something your grandmother made and you go, 'Oh, I remember when I was a kid and she made this.' [Music is] very similar to to that."

03 of 08

TIM MCGRAW

TIM MCGRAW
Clockwise: David Moir/Everett(3), Scott Garfield

Actor
Sandra Bullock wasn't the only big name in 2009's The Blind SideMcGraw was also in the Oscar-nominated movie, playing her husband. But the singer's no one-hit wonder: He's been acting in TV and film since the mid-1990s, and shares the screen with George Clooney in Tomorrowland. Though McGraw told Rolling Stone he's offered many scripts, he's choosy: "It's got to be something that moves me. As an artist, you've got to have a visceral reaction. If you have to think about it, it's probably not the right thing."

04 of 08

TOBY KEITH

TOBY KEITH
Tom Donoghue/Polaris; Inset: Kevin Winter/Getty

Restaurateur
Between his successful I Love This Bar amp Grill restaurant chain and his newest eatery, Big Dog Daddy's Ice House, Keith clearly loves feeding people. But he's as serious about his business ventures as he is his music. "For every deal we cut with somebody … there's 50 of them that come through that get rejected,” he said on the CMT After Midnite radio show. "But when one [pitch] makes sense and it passes the five-star A-team's interview and research, then we look at it."

05 of 08

KIMBERLY SCHLAPMAN

KIMBERLY SCHLAPMAN
Peter Kramer/NBC

Cooking Show Host
When the Little Big Town artist shot the pilot for Kimberly's Simply Southern cooking show, her knees "were literally knocking because I didn't know what in the world I was doing cooking in front of a camera," she told The Tennessean. But Schlapman must have been a quick learner because the show – on which she cooks in her own kitchen with other famous country artists – is still a hit with at-home chefs.

06 of 08

TRACE ADKINS

TRACE ADKINS
Saeed Adyani/Everett

Actor and Voiceover Artist
If you thought Elvin's voice on the animated TV series King of the Hill sounded familiar, that's because it belonged to Adkins! The singer has also lent his baritone (and, uh, whole self) to movies like Moms' Night Out and The Lincoln Lawyer. But despite his Hollywood success, the country superstar says he's still proving himself. "The first couple days I'm convincing the director I know what I'm doing," he told AL.com. "That's the best acting job that I do. Once I pull that one off, the rest of it's easy."

07 of 08

ALAN JACKSON

ALAN JACKSON
Rick Diamond/Getty

Restaurateur
When you're a music legend with a new Nashville restaurant, what do you do on opening night? In Jackson's case, you strap on your guitar and start singing to a surprised but enthusiastic crowd! His eatery, the Acme Feed amp Seed, is part of a retail complex housed in a century-old brick Victorian building. "I love old things," Jackson told PEOPLE. "I've always loved that building, since back when it was still a farm store. It was sad to see it empty so I am proud to be a part of this.”

08 of 08

CHARLEY PRIDE

CHARLEY PRIDE
Ron Jenkins/Getty

Baseball Team Owner
In a way, the legendary singer has gone back to his roots: In the late 1950s Pride became an outfielder and pitcher for the Memphis Red Sox ("I wanted to break every record by the time I was 35," he told PEOPLE in 1980). Eventually he chose music over sports and, after a chart-topping career that included being the first African American to play the Grand Ole Opry, became a part-owner of the Texas Rangers in 2011. "[The title] has a nice ring to it," he told mlb.com. "I like it. I don't have any policy-making authority, but they do ask me my opinion."

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