Rebekah Gregory raced in the Boston Marathon on Monday

By Drew Mackie
Updated April 20, 2015 09:30 PM
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Rebekah Gregory lost her leg in the Boston Marathon bombing in 2013, but on Monday she crossed the finish line in that same race.

In an interview with ABC News, Gregory called crossing the finish line “surreal,” explaining that bad weather, a swollen leg and twisting her knee made the first half of the race difficult.

“Halfway through, I was like, ‘I don’t know if I can do this,’ ” she said. “The emotion just brought back everything from that day and I started reliving the whole experience. But when I was able to see the finish line, I knew I had to finish.”

Gregory, 27, was standing near the finish line in 2013 when the bomb exploded. On April 15, she wrote on Facebook about how running in the Boston Marathon again was an emotional experience for her.

“A few days from now I will be going back to that same pavement on Boylston Street. The pavement where I thought for sure I would die,” she wrote. “This time … the only thing hitting the ground will be my running shoe, as I show myself and the rest of the world that I am back, stronger than ever. … and there is NO stopping me now.”

On Monday morning, Gregory posted a photo of herself on Instagram in her running gear, with the simple caption, “I’m ready.”

Gregory told ABC that she was “running for everyone – for the lives lost that day, for the families and the survivors and essentially for America.”

When asked if she thought about Dzhokhar Tsarnaev, the man convicted on April 8 on 30 counts related to the bombing, Gregory said no.

“I dedicated my miles to the people that mean the most to me in my life,” she said. “I really didn’t think about him.”

She also said that she “absolutely” agrees with those calling for Tsarnaev to be spared from the death penalty. “It’s a tough call to make, and I’m glad I’m not on the jury. But for the people involved it’s just bringing up all of this stuff, and [they’re] having to relive it every single day. There’s no good that can come of that.”

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