"I do my own laundry. I don't watch telly, I clean the house," insists the singer

By Stephen M. Silverman
November 08, 2007 01:30 PM
INF

Amy Winehouse isn’t letting her family’s criticism about her and husband Blake Fielder-Civil’s lifestyle bum her out.

“I think my mum and dad and Blake’s mum and dad were just really worried about us,” the 24-year-old British songbird with the beehive hairdo – and a reputation for landing in trouble – tells V magazine for its 50th issue.

Winehouse, however, believes there is no cause for concern. Overall, she says, “I’m a positive person.”

And a productive one. At home, she says, “I do my own laundry. I don’t really watch telly, I clean the house. I’m a housewife!”

Six hours late in making her scheduled call to the V interviewer, the singer isn’t shy about addressing her in-laws’ call for a public boycott of her records until she and Fielder-Civil clean up their acts.

(Speaking on behalf of himself and his wife, Georgette, Blake’s father, Giles Fielder-Civil, told the BBC in August: “Georgette and I both believe that [Amy and Blake] are drug addicts, and they don’t believe they are. I think they believe they are recreational users of drugs, and they are in control, but it seems to Georgette and I that this isn’t the case.”)

Responds Winehouse: “At first Blake’s parents couldn’t quite suss out whether my parents wanted the best for both of us or just me, and I’m sure my mum and dad were wondering the same. But Georgette, my mother in law, I love her so much. I’m just like her kid, you know.”

Cover by photographer David Sims

As for Giles Fielder-Civil’s claim that Amy and Blake’s relationship is so intense that he believes if one were to fatally overdose the other would commit suicide, Winehouse says, “I think that was a bit extreme, really. But I love Blake so much – I’m a very lucky girl.”

Having married in May, Fielder-Civil serves as Winehouse’s muse, though V does point out suggestions from some quarters that he’s about as positive an influence on her as Nancy Spungen was on Sid Vicious – the Sex Pistols punk rocker who overdosed on heroin in 1979, a year after Spungen had been fatally stabbed in their New York hotel room.

But Winehouse denies she possesses a “self-destructive” streak. “I suppose I write songs when I need to get something off my chest and off my mind,” she says, “but I’ve still got happy [songs] as well.”

Advertisement