By LEE AITKENMaria SpeidelJudith NewmanSue Corbett and JOSH EMMONS
Updated February 06, 2006 12:00 PM
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By Nicholas Stargardt

REVIEWED BY JOSH EMMONS

NONFICTION

In his meticulously researched, often heartbreaking account of children’s lives during the Third Reich, historian Stargardt shows how everyone, both aggressor and victim alike, was dehumanized and scarred by the Holocaust. Working from journals of young “Aryan” Germans and European Jews, he sketches how each side of the racial divide pieced together what was happening, along the way playing games (of policeman and hiding Jew, for example), inventing songs, painting pictures and keeping diaries that were innocent or sadly comprehending. The book powerfully illustrates how young people managed to create in the middle of unimaginable adult destruction.