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Bree Olson Says Ex-Boyfriend Charlie Sheen Never Told Her He Is HIV-Positive

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Bree Olson is refuting her ex-boyfriend Charlie Sheen‘s claim that he told all of his past sexual partners he is HIV-positive.

During a Tuesday interview on The Howard Stern Show, the former porn star, 29, spoke out against the actor, 50, who revealed he was diagnosed with HIV about four years ago during an interview with Today‘s Matt Lauer on Tuesday.

“I watched, right before I came in here … the interviewer asked him: ‘Was this during the tiger blood thing, is this because of that?’ And he even admittedly said, he’s like: ‘Well, I don’t know if it’s necessarily because of that,’ ” an emotional Olson said on the radio show. “So he just admitted right in that interview that is the tiger blood time – that’s when I was with him! I was living with him! We were sleeping together every single night.”

Charlie Sheen and Bree Olson in 2011
Daniel Boczarski/Getty
When Stern asked if Sheen ever told her about his diagnosis, Olson vehemently denied him ever saying anything about it.

“Never said anything. Ever. ‘I’m clean,’ he told me. ‘I’m clean, I’m clean.’ ”

Olson, whose real name is Rachel Oberlin, lived with Sheen in 2011 as one of the “goddesses” in his Los Angeles home following his public meltdown and firing from Two and a Half Men.

“I loved him, yes, he was my boyfriend,” Olson told Stern on Tuesday. “I left the industry for him and I never went back.”

Olson added that Sheen wanted to use lambskin condoms, which are less effective at protecting against sexually transmitted diseases.

“At first, when we first started dating, you know, I’m like, ‘Why lambskin? Can we just use a regular Trojan, or whatever?’ … And I hesitated, and I made the same mistake that a lot of people do – you know, I just trusted him. I trusted him,” she said.

Olson said there were also times the two didn’t use condoms at all.

“You know, this is once I’m now living with him, he’s my live-in boyfriend. And again, stupid on me for not us both getting tested, but I feel a lot people make this mistake,” she said. “You have a live-in boyfriend, what’s the chances … that you both went and got tested before doing a move-in, live-in situation with one another.”

Olson maintains she is not HIV-positive. On Friday, before news broke about her ex-boyfriend, she posted a message on her website announcing she did not contract the disease, though she did not name Sheen in the post.

She also appeared on Inside Edition, where she said Sheen insisted he had no sexually transmitted diseases.

“He used this word: I’m clean. I’m clean and – I know… but I believed him,” she said. She went on to say of Sheen: “He’s a monster.”

“He says he found out when him and I were together,” she told Inside Edition. “I was living in his house. We were having sex every single night.”

During his interview with Lauer, Sheen said he was diagnosed after he suffered from “crushing headaches and insane migraines and sweating the bed, completely drenched two to three nights in a row.”

Sheen also said that since then has only had unprotected sex with two women, who were both “warned ahead of time” and under the care of his doctor.

The actor added he does not “entirely” know how he contracted HIV but has not transmitted it to anyone else and wants to help people by sharing his story.

If Olson’s claims that Sheen did not disclose his diagnosis to her are true, she could file a civil suit against him.

“He is at risk at losing civil judgments to all the lovers that he’s had if he knew that he was infected and never told them,” Susan Moss, a family law attorney at Chemtob Moss & Forman, told PEOPLE.

Moss added that someone who contracted HIV from Sheen could sue for millions, and that even exes who didn’t get HIV – but slept with him if he had it and did not disclose that – could file civil suits citing emotional distress.

To learn more about living with HIV/AIDS today and to contribute in the fight against the diseases, visit amfAR.org.