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RIP

Former Capitals Coach Bryan Murray Dies at 74 After Colon Cancer Battle

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Former Capitals coach and Senators general manager Bryan Murray died Saturday at the age of 74.

Murray coached the Capitals from 1981-1990 and led the team to the playoffs in each of the seasons he completed as coach. He also coached the Red Wings, Panthers, Ducks and Senators, the latter of which he guided to the Stanley Cup finals in 2007.

Murray was named general manager of the Senators in 2007 and remained in that post until he was diagnosed with colon cancer in 2014. In November of 2014, he announced that the cancer had spread and that “there is no cure…at this point.”

Upon the news of his death, some of Murray’s biggest fans shared their memories of him on Twitter.

“Devastated to hear of Bryan Murray’s passing,” wrote Senators player Craig Anderson. “That man is the reason I am in Ottawa. I owe him a lot.”

“I was very saddened to hear of the passing of Bryan Murray,” added Ottowa mayor Jim Watson. “He was a key architect of many of the Senators’ successes.”

The Capitals released the following statement:

“The Washington Capitals organization was saddened to learn of the passing of Bryan Murray. Bryan’s contributions to the game of hockey were outstanding, from his impact in Washington to his more recent service as a senior hockey advisor with the Ottawa Senators. Bryan shaped the lives and careers of countless players. Under his leadership, the Capitals saw the playoffs for the first time in franchise history. In seven full seasons with Washington, Bryan led the team to the playoffs each year, and won the Jack Adams Award in 1984. Not only do we recognize his service to the Capitals, but also across several facets of the National Hockey League. Bryan devoted an incredible life to the sport, and his presence will be deeply missed. We offer our condolences to the Murray family, friends, staff, players and all those whom he touched throughout his storied career.”

This article originally appeared on Si.com