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The Royals

Prince William Flies to Aid in the Rescue of a Drowning Boy, 16, In A Lake

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Mark Cuthbert/UK Press via Getty Images

An English teenager died in a lake yesterday despite the efforts of emergency crews — including Prince William and his air ambulance helicopter team — who were called to help at the scene.

Police confirmed to PEOPLE that the 16-year-old boy died after swimming in a lake at Lee Valley Regional Park in Cheshunt, Hertfordshire, just north of London on Thursday.

William was a part of the air ambulance crew that was sent to the lake along with the fire service to attend to the emergency. Photos and video footage of William at the lake were published in The Daily Mirror on Friday.

A Hertfordshire police spokeswoman tells PEOPLE, “It was reported that a 16-year-old boy had been swimming in a lake when he got into difficulties. A search led by the fire service was carried out. The boy was recovered from the water but sadly he was pronounced dead at the scene.”

She continued: “There are no suspicious circumstances surrounding the incident and a file will be prepared for the coroner of Hertfordshire.”

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A local, who witnessed the crew’s arrival, told the Mirror they were surprised when Prince William got out of the helicopter.

“We knew something was up when a helicopter was flying extremely low just over the Lee Valley Park,” they said. “We could see it was landing so ran over to see what was going on. Little did we expect to see Prince William himself flying the helicopter.”

After a little over two years, William is coming to the end of his time working as a pilot with the East Anglian Air Ambulance.

In the fall he, Princess Kate and their children Prince George and Princess Charlotte will relocate to Kensington Palace to spend the working week in London. George is set to head to school this fall, with William concentrating more on royal duties and engagements.