Ash Knotek/Zuma
Jodi Guglielmi
September 20, 2016 11:30 AM

Angelina Jolie and Brad Pitt hadn’t been photographed together for more than two months leading up to their split.

Multiple sources confirmed to PEOPLE that Jolie, 41, filed for divorce from Pitt. According to TMZ, legal docs filed Monday cite irreconcilable differences, and Jolie is asking for physical custody of the couple’s shared six children – Maddox, Pax, Zahara, Shiloh, Vivienne and Knox – with Pitt being granted visitation rights.

They were last seen together in public making a stop inside a Jamba Juice store in Los Angeles with their daughter Shiloh in July.

Leading up to their second wedding anniversary in August, the couple had spent a large part of the past couple months apart due to their hectic work schedules.

With Pitt, 52, having wrapped his upcoming movies Allied and War Machine, which both shot overseas, and Jolie finished filming First They Killed My Father, the two were busy with post- (and pre-) production on their many projects.

Jolie has also kept up with her humanitarian efforts over the year as a special envoy for the United Nations’ refugee agency.

In the past year, the actress has spoken out in front of a House of Lords committee in London and led an honorary committee for this year’s Cambodian International Film Festival. Most recently, she advocated for victims of sexual assault in war zones.

WATCH: Angelina Jolie Files for Divorce From Brad Pitt

Over the holidays, the then-couple were spotted taking a romantic getaway together to Vietnam. They spent three days traveling the country and enjoying various local activities, including a boat ride around the bay.

“They looked happy,” an observer told PEOPLE at the time. “[They were] holding hands, laughing.”

And prior to jetting off together, the pair had been living in Cambodia with their six children while Jolie finished filmed First They Killed My Father: A Daughter of Cambodia, a film based on the memoir by author and human rights activist Loung Ung about the brutal Khmer Rouge regime of the 1970s.

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