Mike Miller
November 14, 2017 02:10 PM

 

Bryan Cranston believes there is room for forgiveness for Harvey Weinstein and Kevin Spacey.

The Breaking Bad star told BBC, “It would take time, it would take a society to forgive them, and it would take tremendous contrition on their part. And a knowingness that they have a deeply rooted psychological and emotional problem and it takes years to mend that.”

His comments come after he previously told BBC Newsbeat that despite being a “phenomenal actor,” Spacey is “not a very good person.” He added, “His career now I think is over.”

Spacey, 58, is currently facing multiple allegations of sexual misconduct after Star Trek: Discovery actor Anthony Rapp accused the Oscar-winner of making inappropriate sexual advances towards him when he was only 14 in an October BuzzFeed article.

In response to the report, Spacey tweeted a statement saying he didn’t remember Rapp’s alleged incident and apologized “for what would have been deeply inappropriate drunken behavior.” He also publicly came out as gay, which was met with criticism from prominent LGBTQ celebrities.

Spacey has not issued a response to any of the allegations beyond Rapp. Last week, a representative for the actor confirmed he was seeking treatment.

Meanwhile, Weinstein has been accused of sexual misconduct by over 50 women since The New York Times and The New Yorker documented decades of alleged sexual misconduct and sexual assault involving a number of women in detailed articles earlier this month.

A spokesperson for Weinstein previously told PEOPLE in a statement that “any allegations of non-consensual sex are unequivocally denied by Mr. Weinstein. Mr. Weinstein has further confirmed that there were never any acts of retaliation against any women for refusing his advances.”

RELATED: Kevin Spacey Allegedly Showed Teen Porn & Groped a Journalist in New Claims Against Him

 

Cranston said there is still a chance for the producer and actor to make a comeback if they “were to show us that they put the work in and were truly sorry and making amends and not defending their actions but asking for forgiveness then maybe down the road there is room for that.”

He added, “Then it would be up to us to determine, case by case, whether or not this person deserves a second chance.”

Cranston said it would be wrong to not give them a chance at redemption. “We shouldn’t close it off and say, ‘To hell with him, rot, and go away from us for the rest of your life.’ Let’s not do that. Let’s be bigger than that. Let’s leave it open for the few who can make it through that gauntlet of trouble and who have reclaimed their life and their dignity and their respect for others. Maybe it’s possible.”

He added that it “would be egotistical for anyone to say, ‘I hope he fails.’ To that person, I would say, ‘F— you. Why would you want that? So you can be right?’ ”

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