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You Can Now Stay Overnight in the House From A Christmas Story for $500 — Bunny Pajamas Not Included

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Good news for all fans of the classic 1983 holiday flick A Christmas Story: You can now stay overnight in the film’s iconic 19th-century Victorian home in Cleveland, Ohio. If you’ve ever dreamed of living like the wacky Parker family and reading by the light of a glowing leg lamp (get yours here) while sporting pink bunny pajamas (these should do the trick), well, here’s your chance.

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The original 1895 home, which was carefully restored in 2004, and the museum across the street have been open for public tours for more than a decade. But starting in June, if a visit to the home makes you want to move in, you can book the entire place overnight for up to six guests. From an hour after the museum’s closing time until 9 a.m. the following day, you’ll have free reign to hide in the kitchen cabinets, listen to your favorite radio program, and snuggle up in Ralphie and Randy’s twin beds. In addition to a bedroom, living room, and bathroom, the home also includes a full kitchen, so you can whip up a turkey dinner (and since pets aren’t permitted, you will actually get to enjoy it).

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For a one-night stay, rates start at $495 and jump up to $1,995 during the holiday season. The cost of the rental includes a tour of the museum and discounts at the Rowley Inn across the street (sorry Peking duck fans, the film’s Chop Suey Palace scene was actually shot in Toronto, Canada). The house’s availability calendar is already beginning to fill up (check here for open dates), so you may want to book your trip now. Consider the home for a Christmas-in-July celebration—that way, you won’t have to worry about the malfunctioning furnace or risk getting your tongue stuck to a flagpole.

This article originally appeared on Realsimple.com