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Today, in the Most Boston News Ever: Someone Brought a Live, 20-pound Lobster Through Airport Security at Logan International

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Overhead of a red cooked lobster.

The catch of the day goes to the TSA.

Officials from the Transportation Security Administration at Boston Logan International Airport found a 20-pound lobster in someone’s checked luggage over the weekend.

An image of the massive crustacean was shared by TSA official Michael McCarthy, who looks pretty impressed by the lobster’s incredible size.

Even though finding the lobster likely came as a surprise during a routine search, the passenger was able to keep their prize catch, according to The Boston Globe.

“I cannot speak to any airline policies, but TSA has no prohibition on transporting lobsters. It’s actually fairly common in the New England region,” McCarthy wrote in an email to The Globe.

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McCarthy also wrote that the lobster must have been the biggest TSA has ever seen in their daily screening process.

The TSA website states that live lobsters are allowed through security, but “must be transported in a clear, plastic, spill-proof container.” The TSA policy is to inspect any live lobster that comes through screening before being put on a flight. It’s also important for passengers to check with the airport before flying with crustaceans in tow.

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According to McCarthy, this live lobster was held in a cooler and “cooperated quite nicely with the screening process.”

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Finding weird items is actually pretty common in the daily life of a TSA agent. The TSA Instagram is full of rare, bizarre, and sometimes downright dangerous things people have tried to take on flights.

But it’s good to know tonight’s seafood dinner is cleared to be on the table.

This article originally appeared on Travelandleisure.com