Megan Stein
January 08, 2018 01:34 PM

Fans of the original Trading Spaces can rest easy: The show’s reboot officially includes some of the hilarious design fails and cringe-worthy homeowner reactions you know and love, a new interview confirms.

“Not every episode has a happy ending,” TLC’s executive vice president of development and production Howard Lee tells TV Guide. “What one of our designers does with eggshells is shocking. Dozens and dozens of eggs were harmed.”

Returning carpenter Ty Pennington echoes the sentiment, noting that it’s the show’s unpredictability that separates it from the pristine renovations viewers have come to expect on TV since Trading Spaces ended in 2008.

RELATED: Inside the Moment the Trading Spaces Cast Reunited after 10 Years: ‘We Cried Our Eyes Out’

“Most shows now are all reveals of white and beige rooms with a ton of candles and the homeowners loving it,” Pennington says. “With us, there’s always that question mark.”

Another major difference is the budget. While the show’s original $1,000 budget has been doubled to $2,000 per room, it’s shockingly low compared to other makeover shows.

“Viewers have become so accustomed to seeing designs done for $50,000 or $100,000. I think this will be inspiring,” Lee explains of the cost-conscious move.

RELATED: Trading Spaces Is Returning to TV: See the Original Show’s Most Cringe-Worthy Reveals

TLC has cast both veterans and newcomers for the show, returning this spring. Joining Pennington and host Paige Davis will be original designers Doug Wilson, Genevieve Gorder, Hildi Santo-Tomas, Vern Yip, Frank Bielic, and Laurie Smith. Carpenter Carter Oosterhouse will also be back. (The network has made no comment about the recent sexual harassment allegations brought against him). Sabrina Soto, John Gidding and Kahi Lee, Brett Tutor and Joanie Sprague are the fresh faces along for the ride.

Luckily, it was easy for the OG cast to fall back into a successful stride. “Nobody had changed a single bit, including myself,” Pennington says. “We’re like brothers and sisters.”

WATCH THIS: Do You Remember These Spectacular ‘Trading Spaces’ Fails?


Davis is confident the show’s original viewers will feel right at home, too: “The new episodes we’ve made are like Coke Classic,” she says.

And they can only hope the audience will be just as diverse and wide-reaching as it was ten years ago.

“I remember these tattooed motorcycle guys cruising by me yelling, ‘Hey, you’re Ty from Trading Spaces!’” Pennington recalls in the feature of an unlikely encounter during the original run. “I’d be like, ‘You’re watching?’”

RELATED: Trading Spaces Has a New Carpenter and He’s . . . Well, You Should Probably Take a Look at This

TLC announced it would bring back the fan-favorite show that launched a dozen TV careers (and arguably the home makeover genre) last year. “This is a big one,” said TLC president and general manager Nancy Daniels at the Discovery Communications Upfront in March.

The new season of Trading Spaces and a reunion special will both air in 2018.

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