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It's So Hot in Arizona Right Now, They Can't Fly Planes

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The silhouettes of travelers are seen as a United Continental Holdings Inc. plane takes off from Phoenix Sky Harbor International Airport (PHX) in Phoenix, Arizona, U.S., on Friday, Sept. 6, 2013. Yields on benchmark securities climbed to almost two-year highs as consumers spent more on travel and tourism while manufacturing expanded modestly from early July through late August, according to the Federal Reserves Beige Book. Photographer: Patrick T. Fallon/Bloomberg via Getty Images

More than 40 flights have been canceled in Phoenix, as the “extreme heat” is making planes too hot to fly. The temperature in Arizona could reach 118.4 degrees Fahrenheit (48 degrees Celsius) by this afternoon, according to the Weather Network.
American Airlines, which runs several regional flights in the state, cancelled dozens of flights leaving Phoenix Sky Harbor International Airport between 3 p.m. and 6 p.m., to destinations including Santa Barbara, Calif.; Palm Springs, Calif.; Los Angeles; and Tucson, Ariz.

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A statement from the airline suggested that the maximum operating temperature for a number of aircrafts (127 degrees for an Airbus, 126 degrees for a Boeing and 118 degrees for a Bombardier CRJ regional aircraft) had been reached, or was expected to be reached later in the day.

Customers have the option of either rebooking their flights or cancelling their trip and requesting a full refund. “We continue to offer flexibility for our customers who are scheduled to arrive/depart PHX June 19-21 between 3 p.m. and 6 p.m,” American Airlines’ statement says.

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Due to thunderstorms in the north east of the United States, a number of flights have been delayed or cancelled. This is not connected to the weather in Arizona.

 

This article originally appeared on Fortune.com