Dina Coloma
Maria Pasquini
September 22, 2017 06:13 PM

Say it ain’t dough!

A class action lawsuit was filed in Manhattan federal court against the popular New York City-based cookie dough shop (pronounced “doe”) for allegedly making customers sick and falsely claiming its food products were safe to eat.

The lawsuit was filed by plaintiffs Julia Canigiani and Katherine Byrne, according to Bloomberg. Canigiani ordered a an ice cream sandwich made with cookie dough cookies, while Byrne ordered a scoop of oatmeal M&M cookie dough.

The complaint went on to allege that “within approximately 15 minutes, plaintiff Canigiani began experiencing stomach pains, then suffered from vomiting and diarrhea the rest of that evening.” Byrne alleges that after taking just a few bites from her cookie dough, “She felt nauseated. She had heartburn, stomach ache, and nausea through the middle of the next day.” The lawsuit also cites several Yelp reviewers who claimed they similarly suffered after eating at DŌ, according to Top Class Actions.

In a statement to PEOPLE, DŌ has vehemently denied the allegations. “We stand behind the safety of our products and our representations about our products,” the restaurant says. “We will fully and faithfully defend ourselves against any and all false accusations. The health and happiness of our customers has, and always will be, a top priority.”

You dōserve this bowl of brownie batter. 🍪🍫🥛 #cookiedonyc #cookiedough #browniebatter #nomnom #eating #dessert #sweets

A post shared by DŌ, Cookie Dough Confections™ (@cookiedonyc) on

Although regular raw cookie dough can cause a variety of food-borne illnesses, DŌ’s dough is said to be made with pasteurized egg products and heat-treated flour. The shop’s website maintains that all of its products are “worry-free.”

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“Plaintiffs were excited to try the social media buzz-worthy products,” Brittany Weiner, an attorney representing the plaintiffs told Bloomberg. They “were obviously disappointed after it failed to meet the marketed representation that one would not get sick.”

DŌ was founded by Kristen Tomlan in January 2017 and has been a massive success ever since it opened its doors. “We were unprepared for how popular it was going to be,” Tomlan, 29, told PEOPLE in July. “We were turning people away!”

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