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Crime

Woman Who Claimed Sandy Hook Massacre Was Hoax and Threatened Victim’s Dad Gets 5 Months

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Lucy Richards
Paula McMahon/South Florida Sun-Sentinel via AP

Her prison sentence is no hoax.

A Florida woman who believed the Sandy Hook Elementary School shooting was fake and admitted to sending death threats to the father of a 6-year-old boy killed in the massacre has been sentenced to five months in prison, PEOPLE confirms.

On Wednesday, Lucy Richards, 57, pleaded guilty to one count of transmitting threats in interstate commerce, the U.S. Attorney’s office said in a statement. In addition to her prison sentence, she will have to serve five months of house arrest with electronic monitoring.

Before her sentencing, Richards said, “I don’t know where my head and my heart were that day when I made the calls, but they were not in the right place,” the Sun Sentinel reports.

Richards left three threatening voicemails for Lenny Pozner, who lives in Florida, and sent him one email in January 2016, according to a federal indictment obtained by PEOPLE.

Pozner’s son, Noah, was killed on Dec. 14, 2012, when a 20-year-old man fatally shot 20 first-graders and six educators at Sandy Hook Elementary School in Newton, Connecticut in the second-deadliest school shooting in U.S. history.

In the email message Richards allegedly sent to Pozner, she wrote in all caps: “LOOK BEHIND YOU IT IS DEATH,” according to the filed charges.

On Wednesday, the judge told Richards, “Your words were cruel and insensitive,” the Sentinel reports. “Your words … do have consequences. Words do matter. This is reality. There is no fiction [here] and there are no alternative facts.”

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The judge ordered Richards to continue to receive mental health treatment and prevented her from possessing guns or weapons.

He also banned her from visiting several websites that promote conspiracy theories that falsely claim the Sandy Hook and other mass shootings never happened.

She was also ordered to serve three years of supervised release, according to the statement.

Richards was part of a group of people who insist that some mass shootings are part of a government hoax or conspiracy to take away gun rights, the judge said, according to WISN.

Richards had told authorities she “got angry” when she saw websites falsely claiming the shooting was a government hoax, prosecutors said in court in December.

One of the three voicemails Richards left for Pozner said, “You gonna die, death is coming to you real soon,” according to the federal indictment obtained by PEOPLE.

Richards also said, “Death is coming to you real soon and there’s nothing you can do about it,” according to the document.

Richards was arrested Dec. 7 in Brandon, Florida.

Richards’ public defender could not immediately be reached for comment.