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Washington Woman Finds Crying Newborn in Trash Compactor: 'It's the Saddest and Sickest Thing I've Seen in My Entire Life'

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http://KPTV.images.worldnow.com/interface/js/WNVideo.js?rnd=241445;hostDomain=www.kptv.com;playerWidth=630;playerHeight=385;isShowIcon=true;clipId=12317357;flvUri=;partnerclipid=;adTag=Station%252050;advertisingZone=;enableAds=true;landingPage=;islandingPageoverride=false;playerType=STANDARD_EMBEDDEDscript;controlsType=fixedKPTV – FOX 12

A newborn baby that was found in a trash compactor outside an Everett, Washington, apartment building late Friday is in stable condition, police tell PEOPLE.

The building’s maintenance supervisor was preparing to start the trash compactor when she heard a baby crying, KOMO News reported.

The woman called 911 and climbed into the compactor to search for the source of the cries.

“In a dress, she dove into the garbage compactor and began pulling out bags of garbage, trying to search for this thing,” the woman’s boyfriend, Jeff Meyers, told the news station.

Jeff Meyers

The couple was still searching when police arrived to the scene. Officers found the newborn boy and he was immediately transported to a hospital for medical attention, according to the Everett Police Department.

The newborn infant was covered in blood and his umbilical cord was still attached. There was no indication of when or why the baby was left in the dumpster.

“Thank God Paula didn’t hit that button,” Meyers said. “I mean, had that baby not cried one second before she hit that button, we’d be out here for a much worse story.”

“Someone had the baby and just discarded it into the garbage,” he continued. “It’s the saddest and sickest thing I’ve seen in my entire life.”

The baby was rushed to the hospital where he remains in stable condition, Officer Aaron Snell tells PEOPLE.

The Everett Police Department is seeking information from the public to help them find whoever left the baby. “At this point in time we don’t have any leads in trying to establish who the parents are in this case,” Snell said.

In Washington, individuals may freely drop off unharmed babies at any fire station or emergency room with no questions asked under the Safe Haven law. There is a fire station just half a mile from where the baby was found.