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Beyoncé Shares Call to Action After Fatal Police Shootings: 'Fear Is Not an Excuse. Hate Will Not Win'

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Beyoncé is using her platform to demand government action in the wake of the police shooting deaths of Philando Castile and Alton Sterling.

In a powerful statement posted to her website, Thursday, the pop star hearkened to her hit song “Freedom,” writing, “We are sick and tired of the killings of young men and women in our communities.”

“It is up to us to take a stand and demand that they ‘stop killing us,’ ” Beyoncé wrote. “We don’t need sympathy. We need everyone to respect our lives.”

The singer charged that the issue goes beyond just black men and women, encompassing “anyone who feels marginalized, who is struggling for freedom and human rights.”

Beyonce.com

“Fear is not an excuse. Hate will not win,” she said. “We all have the power to channel our anger and frustration into action. We must use our voices to contact the politicians and legislators in our districts and demand social and judicial changes.”

Alongside the post, Beyoncé linked to ContactingtheCongress.org, as well as the Louisiana State Legislature website for those wishing to “protest for Alton Sterling,” and the Minnesota State Legislature website for those wanting to “voice protest for Philando Castile.”

Sterling and Castile, both black men, were killed in officer-related shootings in Louisiana and Minnesota within a 48-hour span.

Castile, 32, was killed in Falcon Heights, Minnesota, during a traffic stop Wednesday. He was shot in front of his girlfriend and her child as he reached for his driver’s license, his girlfriend said.

Sterling, 37, was shot Tuesday by police outside of a convenience store in Baton Rouge, Louisiana, where he was selling CDs in the parking lot.

Philando Castile
Alton Sterling
David Grunfeld/NOLA.com/The Times-Picayune

Beyoncé previously featured the mothers of men killed at the hands of police by showing the women holding pictures of the young men in her visual album Lemonade.

The cameos include Sybrina Fulton whose son is Trayvon Martin, Gwen Carr – mother to Eric Garner, and Lezley McSpadden, whose son is Michael Brown.

She also paid tribute to victims of police brutality while performing in Glasgow, Scotland, Thursday, displaying their names on a lit screen during a moment of silence.

After paying her respects, the singer performed an emotionally charged a cappella version of “Freedom.”

Here is Beyoncé’s statement in full:

We are sick and tired of the killings of young men and women in our communities. It is up to us to take a stand and demand that they ‘stop killing us.’

We don’t need sympathy. We need everyone to respect our lives. We’re going to stand up as a community and fight against anyone who believes that murder or any violent action by those who are sworn to protect us should consistently go unpunished.

These robberies of lives make us feel helpless and hopeless but we have to believe that we are fighting for the rights of the next generation, for the next young men and women who believe in good.

This is a human fight. No matter your race, gender or sexual orientation. This is a fight for anyone who feels marginalized, who is struggling for freedom and human rights.

This is not a plea to all police officers but toward any human being who fails to value life. The war on people of color and minorities needs to be over.

Fear is not an excuse. Hate will not win.

We all have the power to channel our anger and frustration into action. We must use our voices to contact the politicians and legislators in our districts and demand social and judicial changes.

While we pray for the families of Alton Sterling and Philando Castile, we will also pray for an end to this plague of injustice in our communities.

Click in to contact the politicians and legislators in your area. Your voice will be heard.

We all have the power to channel our anger and frustration into action. We must use our voices to contact the politicians and legislators in our districts and demand social and judicial changes.