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Country

Country Duo Big & Rich Show Us Their Softer Side and Reveal Who’s More Romantic

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When it comes to country duo Big & Rich’s soft side, Big Kenny and John Rich admit that their music is actually inspired by that special someone.

“A few songs in there specifically for me, I wrote ‘em for my woman,” Kenny tells PEOPLE Now. “Having someone in my life like my wife, like John’s, well you want those kind of songs that will make ‘em feel good about everything.”

As for which bandmate is more romantic?  “He’s the universal minister of love,” shares Rich. “You really can’t compete with that.”

Explains Kenny: “Well you know there’s one thing to say you’re romantic then there’s another thing to you know have someone in your life that makes you want to be romantic and my woman makes me want to be romantic.”

Specifically, Kenny, says that the duo’s new song, “Turns Me On,” off of their latest album Did It For the Party was inspired by his wife of 12 years, Christiev Carothers.

“It talks about the crazy things,” shares Kenny. “Like clothes left on the floor or brush in the sink or things like that you would think would bother me—but no. ‘It turns me on. I ain’t lying.’”

Teases Rich: “Kenny likes it.”

Along with their romantic songs, Big & Rich are also known for their more risqué tunes, including their hit party anthem, “Save a Horse (Ride a Cowboy).”

“There’s been just hundreds of thousands of horses saved,” Kenny says of the smash single, which first debuted 13 years ago.

“Equality for equines,” explains Rich. “Equine equality.”

 “And it also somehow may have started a whole new baby boom,” adds Kenny.

And when it came to their families’ reactions to the suggestive lyrics, Rich admits they weren’t too concerned.

“Granny’s a little risqué herself,” shares Rich. “Granny will flat-out tell you.”

He continues: And my dad’s a preacher, so the first time he heard ‘Save a Horse (Ride A Cowboy),’ he gave me that: ‘You sure you ought to be…’ Course I told him, ‘You know 10 percent everything it makes goes back to the church daddy.’ And he goes, ‘As long as you’re doing that.’”