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Angelina Jolie Is Not Moving to London: Sources

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Angelina Jolie is not relocating her family to London, multiple sources confirm to PEOPLE.

Although the filmmaker and activist, 41, will be teaching a course at the London School of Economics starting in September, she will not be moving to the British capital and will instead continue to travel back and forth.

“The rumors are nonsense,” a source tells PEOPLE. “She isn’t moving to London.”

Jolie, who is a special envoy to the U.N. High Commissioner for Refugees, will be a visiting professor at the school’s Centre for Women, Peace and Security, teaching a course specializing in the advocacy work she does on behalf of women’s rights and against sexual violence in war zones. In 2012, Jolie co-founded the Preventing Sexual Violence Initiative (PSVI), and in 2015, she helped open the center at LSE.

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Since she’ll be a visiting professor, Jolie will not have to relocate and can travel to London as needed while she continues her work.

“America is her home, it’s where her family lives,” another source confirms to PEOPLE. “She has been traveling around the world for her work for 16 years. Nothing has changed.”

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Jolie currently lives in Los Angeles with her six kids with Brad Pitt — Maddox, 15, Pax, 13, Zahara, 11, Shiloh, 10, and twins Knox and Vivienne, 8 — but frequently travels the world for her humanitarian work and filmmaking duties.

Beginning in September through May 2018, Jolie will teach a 9-month course at LSE, focusing on “the ways in which women and gender are understood in relation to, and affected by, regional, national and global peace and security processes in conflict and post-conflict setting,” according to the school’s website.

Jolie gave her first lecture at the school Tuesday morning, where she focused on women’s rights in the context of refugee camps, and how displacement and statelessness makes women and girls vulnerable to sexual violence and other crimes. The class also discussed the connection between the field and the policy work that is being done by governments, as well as the current state of women’s rights.